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STEM Candidates Can't Deliver Everything You Need. Success Requires Employees From the Arts.
October 26, 2018 12:00 am|Comments (0)

I love STEM. Without STEM students, there wouldn’t be doctors, or the engineers who put together the Inc.com site. Big data has revolutionized the way business is done, and it would be impossible without STEM skills. But when young people ask me what they should study, I always encourage them to consider liberal arts.

Businesses will need people to translate computer language into human language. When big data analytics uncovers a hidden pattern, someone needs to draw conclusions from the information and develop an action plan. If a robot breaks down, someone needs to explain to management why it happened – and why it won’t happen again.

Here are more reasons why you should hire someone from the arts:

1. Fresh Perspective

Hiring an artist is like getting an injection of creativity. Leaders can use this to better market to their customers, and to better connect with their employees. Artists aren’t afraid to be unconventional, but they have no time for inauthenticity. Having these elements as part of your company culture is a great way to attract high quality candidates, and will appeal to the right kind of customers.

2. Agility, with Mission Focus

3. Budget Management

The arts are chronically underfunded. If you’re looking for an employee who can stretch the value of a dollar, the arts are a great place to look. Artists use their creativity, open-mindedness, and pain tolerance to make it work. They’re able to stay on course no matter the budgetary constraints, and produce something that looks and feels like money was no object.

4. Personality Tolerance

The arts are full of people with personality – and the spectrum of personality is wide! Imagine putting together a theatre production. You have to work with an idealistic writer, a Method actor, a union stagehand, and a theatre director trying to keep donors happy. People in the arts are used to handling a variety of personalities and balancing competing interests while keeping everyone happy and working together. It’s a skill any office can benefit from, and can help keep your company humming.

5. Content Over Medium

This is perhaps the most important reason you should hire someone from the arts. With constantly changing technology and evolving tastes of customers, it can be difficult for business to find the right way to connect with employees and consumers. But here’s what many business leaders forget: the method of communication doesn’t matter if the content is garbage. To reach your desired audience, your content needs to make an impact. Artists are expressive, and know how to use humor, trauma, and beauty to make an emotional impact on the audience. No matter the medium, artists can effectively communicate your message, helping your culture blossom and your business grow.

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China Can't Stop Falling: Tencent Is Still A Conviction Buy
October 15, 2018 12:01 am|Comments (0)

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2 Sales On Dividends You Can't Miss In 2018
June 16, 2018 6:05 pm|Comments (0)

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3 Things Apple Believes It Can't Teach Employees
March 17, 2018 6:05 pm|Comments (0)

Apple is one of the most desired employers in the world. It’s been said getting a job at an Apple store is harder than getting into Harvard. If you want to work there, you might assume you need to be a total tech-expert, but that’s not true. Apple says it can teach you about technology. What they can’t teach you are the soft skills needed to represent the company well.

Online reviews reveal extensive details into what it takes to get hired.

Sites like Glassdoor offer job seekers access to anonymous reviews by people who have gone through the Apple interview process. Reading through them, you quickly see a pattern: Apple uses behavioral interviewing techniques and loves candidates who are comfortable telling stories and speaking up. In fact, one successful applicant summed it up best:

“Apple looks at how you talk more than what you know. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question, but don’t just say, “I don’t know.” Apple loves stories so let your inner J.K. Rowling out! All in all, be confident, smile a lot, don’t be nervous, and stay calm.”

Moreover, if you look for patterns in Apple’s behavioral interview questions, you’ll realize they look for three things they know they can’t teach employees. Apple intensely screens applicants to ensure they already have these important skill sets.

1. Displaying confidence.

Customers don’t buy things from people who lack confidence. If you can’t appear knowledgeable and confident on the job, Apple users may doubt what you’re saying.

2. Knowing how to talk to people. 

Your job in an Apple store is to assist customers. If striking up a conversation with strangers doesn’t come easy to you, you likely won’t enjoy, or succeed in this job.

3. Being a nice person.

Maya Angelou said,

I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Apple customers can feel intimidated by the technology. Store staff need to make customers feel capable and happy with their decision to invest in Apple technology.

P.S. If at first you don’t succeed…

One of the other major pieces of feedback in the hiring process reviews was you shouldn’t give up so easily. Many of the people who posted comments indicate it took several tries to land a job at their dream employer. If you want to work for Apple, you’ll need to have a gameplan and stick to it. Rejection means, “no, not today.” It doesn’t mean, “no, not ever,” unless you give up!

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Austrian can't file Facebook class action suit: EU Court adviser
November 14, 2017 12:00 pm|Comments (0)

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – An Austrian law student cannot bring a class action suit against Facebook’s Irish unit over alleged privacy violations in an Austrian court, an EU court adviser said on Tuesday, but can sue the company in his home country on his own behalf.

FILE PHOTO: A 3D plastic representation of the Facebook logo is seen in this photo illustration May 13, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo

Arguing Facebook violated privacy rules, Max Schrems is claiming 500 euros ($ 576) in damages for each of some 25,000 signatories to his lawsuit, one of a series of European challenges to U.S. technology firms and their handling of personal data.

“A consumer who is entitled to sue his foreign contact partner in his own place of domicile, cannot invoke, at the same time as his own claims, claims on the same subject assigned by other consumers,” the EU top court’s Advocate General Michal Bobek said.

The advocate general, whose opinions are not binding but usually followed by the court, said allowing a class action suit in this case would lead consumers to choose the place of the most favorable court.

Privacy activist Schrems, who had argued that individual lawsuits on user privacy would be “impossible” due to the financial burden on users, said a ruling in line with the advocate general’s opinion would still allow him to set a precedent.

“In the advocate general’s view, I can at least bring a ‘model case’ at my home jurisdiction in Vienna, which may enable us to debate the illegal practices of Facebook in an open court for the first time,” Schrems said in a statement.

Facebook said the advocate general’s opinion supported the decision of two courts that Schrem’s claims could not proceed as a class action.

While common in the United States, class action suits are rarely recognized in Europe.

“It is not for the Court to create such collective redress in consumer matters, but eventually for the Union legislator,” the Advocate General said.

Reporting by Robert-Jan Bartunek in Brussels; additional reporting by Shadia Nasralla in Vienna; editing by Philip Blenkinsop and John Stonestreet

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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