Tag Archives: Comes

Acura's RDX Comes With an Easy-to-Use Infotainment System
May 14, 2018 6:00 am|Comments (0)

The modern car has a problem. Over the past decade, automakers have raced to offer their smartphone-addled customers a bonanza of features: navigation, texting, phone calls, satellite radio, Bluetooth, ways to check tire pressure and oil temperature, suspension settings, charging status, and more. Then they try to stick all those things into an interface whose users are usually pretty busy—driving the 2-ton metal boxes that kill nearly 40,000 people in the US every year.

And the solutions are non-obvious. Touchscreens are easy to use but take drivers’ eyes off the road. Knob-based systems can land you in a warren of menus that get frustrating and distracting. No wonder then, that in a 2017 study, Consumer Reports found just 44 percent of respondents were “very satisfied” with their car’s infotainment system. Among the systems CR deemed the most distracting was Acura’s, which it panned for a “frustrating dual-screen setup, convoluted display logic, and finicky voice-command system.”

Now, after four years of work, Acura has a solution that finds that elusive territory between usefulness and distraction. Starting later this year with the 2019 RDX SUV, Acura will offer the True Touchpad.

Engineer Ross Miller, who led the project, began by talking to people about their washing machines and television remotes. “People get really passionate about things that annoy them.” At the top of that list of annoyances is complexity. Too many buttons, too many options, too many menus.

Miller frames this as a resource management problem. When you’re driving, you can only spare so much of your cortex to figuring out how to turn on that podcast or punch in Auntie’s address. To minimize the time and effort required by the driver, Acura’s team stripped down the main interface to eight tiles, which you can configure however you like. This way, the home screen doesn’t just offer you categories, like “Audio” and “Phone Book,” but shows whatever you tend to look for most often. People being creatures of habit, that usually means a couple of radio stations and one or two contacts. In Acura’s new system, your home screen can offer you “John” and “Jane,” “90s on 9” and “Hair Nation.” All your faves, just a tap away.

The screen sits up high, and is controlled by a touchpad that uses absolute positioning. Want to tap the icon on the bottom left? Hit the bottom left of the pad.

Honda

That tap is where Acura’s real innovation comes in. Miller says touchscreens draw too much attention away from the road, and knob- and button-based systems can be clunky and hard to use. To control the 10.2-inch screen, his team made a new sort of touchpad. Say you want to hear some sweet Mötley Crüe, and Hair Nation is the tile in the upper right of the screen. Just put your finger on the upper right of the touchpad, which sits a few inches forward of the right armrest. If you landed a bit to the left, drag your finger over, see the flash of orange highlight the icon you’re going for, and press down. (Then crank the volume using one of the few knobs.)

Other cars with touchpads use them in the conventional way, to control a cursor on the screen. The problem there is that, just like on your computer, before doing anything you have to find the cursor, then move it to where you need it. In a situation where every instant with your eyes off the road can prove deadly, that kind of timesuck is not ideal.

Meanwhile, touchscreens come with their own problem: The fact that you need to reach them means they’re usually low down, where the radio in an old-timey car would be. And because competently using one requires looking at it, that’s even more time looking away from where you’re going.

Acura’s system is a hybrid of the two. The touchpad allows for a screen up high on the dash, so you can see it with just a flick of the eyes. But instead of letting you control a cursor, it acts like a voodoo doll for the screen: Whatever part of the screen you would tap, you tap that part of the pad.

After a lifetime using a mouse and a decade with touchscreen smartphones and tablets, it took me a bit of getting used to. But within half an hour it felt totally intuitive. A spot to rest the heel of your hand and the raised ridge outlining the pad help with orientation. Real buttons for Home and Back, which Miller calls “centering points,” make sure you never get too lost. (Abandoned concepts: a cursor-like “ghost finger” on the screen representing where the driver’s finger was in real life, and gesture controls. “That didn’t test so well,” Miller says. “It was too complicated; it was really hard to learn.”)

Eventually, the team built the system into a driving simulator and put 30 people behind the wheel. While each performed a series of tasks (call so and so, switch the radio, etc.), Acura’s engineers measured how well they stayed in their lane and away from other cars, to gauge their level of distraction. They compared the results to how those same people drove when performing a simple task, like turning a knob to tune the radio, and found no significant difference.

To go with its new interface, Acura added an improved, more natural voice recognition system and an optional head-up display that’s more capable than most on the market. Where most just show information like speed and navigation directions, this one lets you change where you’re going and make phone calls, using a knurled click wheel on the steering wheel.

Now, Acura drivers get to try it for real. And if they like it as much as the focus groups did, you can expect to see it in the rest of the Acura lineup before long—then maybe the rest of the auto industry.

More Great WIRED Stories

Tech

Posted in: Cloud Computing|Tags: , , , ,
Sennheiser Takes the Long View When it Comes to Superior Sound
December 13, 2016 12:10 pm|Comments (0)

Sennheiser has been at the apogee of the audio business for decades. When I was growing up, a pair of Sennheiser headphones was the aspiration of any knowledgeable audiophile. I recently had a chance to sit down with brothers Andreas and Daniel Sennheiser. They are the company’s co-CEOs; their grandfather founded the company 72 years ago.


Cloud Computing

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , , , ,
Amazingly Gross Predator Toy Accessory Pack Comes With Bloodied Bones and a Skinned Human
November 3, 2016 7:15 pm|Comments (0)

You know, most accessory packs for action figures come with things like extra weapons or extra storage options. Maybe even an extra bit of clothing. Rarely, do they come with an in-scale replica of a human being that’s had all of its skin flayed off.

Read more…


Uncategorized

Link to this post!


RSS-5

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Rio’s Belmond Copacabana Palace comes alive with stunning visuals by…
October 29, 2016 6:50 am|Comments (0)

Spectacular projection mappings that took place each evening in August on the façade of the Belmond Copacabana Palace luxury hotel, located on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

(PRWeb September 23, 2016)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/09/prweb13710970.htm


All articles

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , , , , , ,
What to Do When the Cloud Comes Crashing Down
February 15, 2016 8:10 pm|Comments (0)

NEWS ANALYSIS: Major cloud services are super reliable, until they suffer an outage that can bring your business to its knees for hours or longer. It’s a good idea to always have a Plan B.


RSS-1

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , ,
Minecraft comes to Oculus Rift
January 29, 2016 5:55 pm|Comments (0)

Oculus VR founder Palmer Luckey talks virtual worlds at his Connect event in Los Angeles.

Yes, you can place blocks in virtual reality.

Minecraft: Windows 10 Edition is going to support Oculus Rift, we learned today at Oculus Connect in Los Angeles. Founder Palmer Luckey of Oculus VR announced that Microsoft will bring its block-building phenomenon will support the head-mounted display when it launches in Q1 of 2016.

This is a big get for Rift, which will need high-profile content to help convince people that spending the money to invest in VR is worth it.

Minecraft on Rift is also notable because Minecraft creator Markus “Notch” Persson once called Facebook’s acquisition of the Rift “creepy.” Although, now that Microsoft owns Minecraft, Persson’s opinion on Rift doesn’t matter.

More information:

Powered by VBProfiles



All articles

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , ,