Tag Archives: Famous

A Famous TV Show Just Showed a Different Side of Amazon's Jeff Bezos. It Wasn't Pretty
December 9, 2018 12:01 pm|Comments (0)

I have a feeling it’s happening more often.

As Amazon begins to place a large footprint on every part of America, some people are wondering if that’s entirely a good thing.

Last week, I wrote about a very clever filmmaker who changed the music on Amazon’s latest ad and made the company seem like an alien invader, there to gobble all before it.

Now it’s becoming a trend.

Was he portrayed as an innovative tech genius, bringing joy to all the people of the world?

Not quite.

Instead, here was a man who communicated through a twisted telepathy and spoke in the robotic tones of someone who’d really rather like to immolate you, as soon as you serve no further purpose to him.

He knows how to hit you where it truly hurts.

If you don’t do what he says, he threatens to, gasp, take away your Amazon Prime status.

And who can live without that? 

You might think that anyone who achieves power is likely to face a certain level of ridicule.

What’s different with Amazon is that too may stories are now emerging in which the company appears entirely without heart.

You might imagine there’s little Amazon can do about that.

Growth, after all, is the only characteristic America respects in companies. 

You have to get bigger and bigger until you burst, rather like the average American diner.

Yet Amazon executives are surely concerned that a company claiming to put consumers at its core may become a little more unpopular with those very consumers.

Some might wonder whether, instead of this being Amazon’s prime time, it’s actually the beginning of the end.

Tech

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This Famous Supermarket Chain Released a Tear-Jerking Ad For Christmas. Here's Why It Was Banned
November 10, 2018 12:00 pm|Comments (0)

Absurdly Driven looks at the world of business with a skeptical eye and a firmly rooted tongue in cheek. 

We’re coming to that time of year where we pretend that all humans have hearts and love will find a way.

That time when we give each other gifts, sometimes reluctantly, and hope to get better gifts in return.

That’s somewhat the logic of companies that release warm, emotional Christmas ads. 

They hope that, on giving you such a gift, you’ll immediately rush over to their store to buy lots of things you don’t need.

Still, the UK’s Iceland supermarket chain thought it would raise the tone a little.

What was the baby orangutan doing in her room? Running away from the nasty humans who are destroying its forest, in search of palm oil to put in foods.

Naturally, the little girl takes up the orangutan’s cause.

She’ll fight for its survival.

She’ll presumably make a plea to Santa that he should fly his reindeer over the nasty humans and drop coal all over their rapacious heads.

You might be wondering what all this has to do with Iceland.

Well, the chain is taking this opportunity to say it’s removing palm oil from all its own-label products.

A very Christmassy gesture, you might think. 

Not according to the UK authorities who approve ads, it isn’t. 

You see this ad was originally a Greenpeace film. Iceland merely asked if it could use it and change the ending a little.

Which the UK ad authorities deemed political. So they banned it from UK screens.

One can’t let British children hear political messages, you know. They might grow up wanting to be part of Europe again.

Iceland insists it’s not anti-palm oil, merely anti-deforestation. 

You can imagine, though, that it knew what the rules were and that the ad might be banned.

Which would then create huge publicity. Which would perfectly serve Iceland’s purposes and perhaps even save it a little money along the way.

Indeed, as Richard Walker, son of chain’s founder Malcolm, told the Guardian: “We always knew there was a risk [the clip would not be cleared for TV] but we gave it our best shot.”

Oh, I think you gave it a very fine, cost-effective shot indeed, Richard. 

As I write, the ad has already enjoyed around 1.5 million views on YouTube.

Tech

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Fire Forces Evacuation Of Famous Camp And Village As Wildfire Season Sets In For A Long Stay
June 3, 2018 6:05 pm|Comments (0)

A 30,000 acre wildfire is now burning through the Philmont Scout Ranch shown here outside Cimarron, New Mexico. Both Philmont and the village have been evacuated. The fire comes after one of the driest winters in memory for northern New Mexico. (AP Photo/Mike Dreyfuss)

We saw the first sign of the looming catastrophe that is now bearing down on a beloved small town nestled where the plains meet the Rockies months ago here in the nearby Sangre de Cristo mountains.

As of Sunday, Cimarron, New Mexico is a ghost town with mandatory evacuations in place thanks to the 30,000 acre wildfire sending plumes of choking smoke into skies that have been clear and blue for much of this spring so far. Ash falls on the deserted streets rather than the much-needed rain that might have prevented the wildfire, which sparked to life early Thursday in the forest to the west of town.

But really, we knew it would have taken biblical April and May showers to prevent this from happening. Instead, we’ve had weeks of winds. Nerve-wracking, moisture-sucking gusts whipping down the mountains and across the already crispy plains.

The signs conditions were ripe for an epic fire began to mount in January. The first avalanche safety training of the season, scheduled to take place near the roof of New Mexico at Taos Ski Valley was cancelled due to a severe lack of snow. As in almost none. There was little threat of even lackadaisical snowball  fights this winter, let alone avalanches.

Another month went by and few flurries flew, leading to the cancellation of the second training session.

By February, USDA SNOTEL snowpack reporting stations in the Sangres are typically measuring multiple feet of snow at various spots between 10,000 and 13,000 feet of elevation. This year, most of those stations were returning error messages by mid-February due to a dearth of anything to measure. Rather than piles of snow, only whisps of dry grass and parched pine trees surrounded the automated stations.

Now, as the summer season starts, the state of New Mexico consists of millions of acres of that same dry grass and wood. One of the driest winters in living memory has transformed the Land of Enchantment into a tinderbox. For weeks now we’ve simply been waiting for the spark we knew was inevitable.

Two weeks ago, rafting a popular section of the Rio Grande Gorge near Taos required a few hours to float just a few miles due to the river’s extremely low flow. A bathtub ring-like stain along the huge volcanic boulders lining the riverbed revealed the despairing disparity compared to last spring when nearly ten times as much water was flowing through the canyon.

Further downriver, the Rio Grande is already running dry south of Albuquerque. This is not nearly normal this early in the year.

So yea, we knew this was coming. It was just a question of exactly when and where.

But really, the signs this was coming have been etched on the wall for much longer. Not with words, necessarily, but instead with a more clear and succinct symbol: a hockey stick. Not a real hockey stick, and not really a symbol either, but a real representation of a very real reality. This is the hockey stick I’m talking about.

IPCC/Penn State

The famed “hockey stick” diagram showing the dramatic rise of global temperatures on average in recent years.

The hockey stick tells us the world is getting warmer. It tells us the southwest is getting drier. It has made climate cycles more erratic and extreme. So, this has been a long time coming. No. Actually, it’s been in process for a while now, but things are about to intensify again.

Maybe it’s not again. After all, the hockey stick blade has been growing ever longer in recent years; only the aim of its slapshot changes.

Now, we suppose, it is our turn to be the target. The signs have been visible here for months.

Today the Ute Park Fire is bearing down on Cimarron, home to heaps of Old West history, one of the world’s most famous haunted hotels and the Philmont Scout Camp where millions of memories have been made. Our heads are filled involuntarily with visions of tragedy burned into multiple California landscapes over the past 12 months.

Our distaste of population density like that seen on the coasts may save us from the epic amounts of damage seen in places like Santa Rosa last year, but it won’t be any less devastating.

Wildfire is no longer just a season here; it is a new way of life in the high desert. We are living not on the razor’s edge, but on the ever-lengthening blade of a hockey stick.

Tech

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Meet The Stuntman Who Completed Evel Knievel’s Famous Snake River Canyon Jump
December 11, 2016 8:30 pm|Comments (0)

Forty years ago, Evel Knievel strapped himself into a rocket and tried to fly over Idaho’s immense Snake River Canyon. He didn’t make it. But the stunt launched his lunacy into legend and inspired a generation of adrenaline junkies like Eddie Braun —the man who, this past weekend, completed the epic stunt Knievel couldn’t in a tribute to his hero.

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