Tag Archives: Health

Huawei CFO seeks bail, cites health fears behind bars: court documents
December 10, 2018 12:01 am|Comments (0)

Meng Wanzhou, Executive Board Director of the Chinese technology giant Huawei, attends a session of the VTB Capital Investment Forum “Russia Calling!” in Moscow, Russia October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Alexander Bibik

TORONTO (Reuters) – A top executive of China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL] argued that she should be let out on bail while awaiting an extradition hearing due to severe hypertension and fears for her health while incarcerated in Canada, court documents released on Sunday showed.

Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou is fighting to be released on bail after she was arrested on Dec. 1 in Canada at the request of the United States.

Meng, 46, faces U.S. accusations that she covered up her company’s links to a firm that tried to sell equipment to Iran despite sanctions, a Canadian prosecutor said on Friday, arguing against giving her bail while she awaits extradition to the United States.

In a sworn affidavit, Meng said she is innocent of the allegations and will contest them at trial in the United States if she is surrendered there.

Meng also said she was taken to a hospital for treatment for hypertension after being detained.

China has strongly criticized her detention and demanded her immediate release. The arrest has roiled global markets amid worries it could torpedo possible thawing of trade tensions between the United States and China.

In a bail application seeking her release pending an extradition hearing, Meng said she has longstanding ties to Vancouver dating back at least 15 years, as well as significant property holdings in the city.

Her family also sought leave to remain in Vancouver if she was granted bail, according to the court documents, with her husband saying he plans to bring the couple’s daughter to Vancouver to attend school during the trial.

Reporting by Denny Thomas; Editing by Lisa Shumaker and David Gregorio

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How health care should take advantage of the cloud
August 7, 2018 12:00 pm|Comments (0)

The cloud has come to the health care sector, and it’s having an impact by saving some money. However, that’s not the real value of cloud computing for this sector, a sector that affects us personally at some point in our lives.

Black Book Research found that 93 percent of hospital CIOs are actively acquiring the staff to configure, manage, and support a HIPAA-compliant cloud infrastructure. Also, 91 percent of CIOs in the Black Book survey report that cloud computing provides more agility and better patient care with the proliferation of health care data.

But there is a huge innovation gap when it comes to health care and cloud computing between what’s possible versus what is actually being done. Take patient data, for example. Most health care organizations, providers, and payers don’t make many moves toward better and more proactive management of patient data unless regulations move them along.

This isn’t about operational and billing data, or electronic health records (EHRs). If health care systems abstracted information in certain ways, both the doctor and patient would have better insights into the patients’ health, preventive care, and treatment.

The cloud services that support these innovative functions are now dirt-cheap. As hospitals become cloud-enabled, it’s time to start moving faster toward the complete automation of care, treatments, and analyses of patient health. Let’s move from a system that’s largely reactive to a system that’s completely proactive.

Of course, there are islands of innovation in the health care sector. But it’s still mostly on the R&D side of things and has yet to trickle down to direct patient care. The potential here is greater than in any other sector I’ve seen. Just consider the telemetry information gathered from smart watches and cellphones and the ability to funnel all data though deep learning-enabled systems that cost pennies an hour to run on the cloud.

Now that we have the tools, there is little excuse not to innovate beyond what’s been done already. We’re better than this. 

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Climate Change's Looming Mental Health Crisis
August 2, 2018 12:00 pm|Comments (0)

For the Inuit of Labrador in Canada, climate disaster has already arrived. These indigenous people form an intense bond with their land, hunting for food and fur. “People like to go out on the land to feel good,” says Noah Nochasak in the documentary Lament for the Land. “If they can’t go out on the land, travel a long ways to feel good, they don’t feel like people.”

The Inuit’s lands, though, are warming twice as fast as the global average, imperiling the ice they rely on to travel. In the fall, hunters tend to get stuck in the community, because ice hasn’t fully formed up—and again, in the spring, when things are melting. Climate change is making these ice transition periods even longer.

“During those times historically, there has been some increases in suicide or suicide attempts or ideation in the communities,” says Ashlee Cunsolo, a health geographer who has studied the region. “There is a lot of concern among the mental health practitioners. What does that mean if this time is lengthened from two weeks to eight weeks?”

It’s known as ecological grief—the mourning of ecosystems and species and ways of life that are disappearing as the planet warms. But it isn’t just hitting the Inuit. As our planet plays host to rising seas, more intense storms, and higher temperatures, those conditions will support a growing international mental health crisis.

“Things like depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, domestic abuse, all these things tend to go up in the aftermath of a natural disasters,” says psychologist Susan Clayton of the College of Wooster, co-author of an extensive report on climate change and mental health. “As we have more natural disasters, one would expect to also have increases in those kinds of mental health consequences.”

Take Hurricane Katrina. In its aftermath, a sample of survivors found one in six met the criteria for PTSD. Rates of suicide and suicidal thoughts doubled. And especially in refugee situations, those mental health challenges can be intimately tied to physical health, compounding the harm. “When people are moving to places they bring diseases with them that the home population might not be immune to, and on the flip side these people are moving into places where they might not have immunity to the diseases in the new place,” says Jonathan Patz, director of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin.

Even those whose homes aren’t directly threatened by sea level rise or fiercer hurricanes aren’t immune. By the end of the century, the average American will have to endure four to eight times the number of 95+ degree days. Arizonans will get it particularly bad: Their number of 95+ degree days a year will leap from an average of 116 to over 200. And several studies have made a link between higher temperatures and higher rates of suicide.

One particularly data-intensive survey recently published in Nature Climate Change compiled temperatures and suicide statistics on the county level for the US, and municipality level for Mexico. They compared these granular regions not with each other, but with themselves—so the average monthly temperature in Palo Alto in July 2009 versus July 2010. This controlled for differences between locations in factors like poverty rates or gun ownership rates, both of which have been tied to suicide rates.

The uptick in suicide rates the researchers found may be small—a rise of 2 percent in Mexico and .7 percent in the US for every additional degree Celsius in average monthly temperature—and the relationship is far from simple. Rates of suicide fluctuate around the world, and where those suicide rates are highest, the temperature isn’t necessarily the highest. But extrapolated forward, the impact on public health could be devastating. “The fact that our results are so consistent across different socioeconomic strata, across different populations, suggests a common biological response,” says Stanford economist Marshall Burke, lead author of the study.

It’s unclear if scientists will unearth shared mechanisms behind the mental health effects of climate-related trauma. But the experience itself is obviously, intuitively human. When Cunsolo and a colleague published an essay in Nature Climate Change earlier this year on ecological grief, the email response they got was huge, and it was cosmopolitan.

“It wasn’t drought-affected farmers, it wasn’t low-lying island states, it wasn’t people who had been forced to relocate, it was people often living in urban settings would describe this overall sense of despair and anxiety,” says Cunsolo.

The root of our shared problem may be the same, but the manifestations of climate change can be wildly different. “Each region, each place, each culture, is going to experience something very, very different,” says Cunsolo. For the Inuit, it’s about ice. For the Southern US, it’s supercharged hurricanes. As with all health care, prevention is the best medicine. But in the case of climate change, we may be too late.


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Better health care through the cloud? Don't count on it
February 21, 2017 1:10 pm|Comments (0)

According to market researcher Technavio, the global health care cloud computing market will grow more than 21 percent from 2017 to 2021.


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Obamacare’s Demise Is a Looming Disaster for Mental Health
January 16, 2017 3:35 am|Comments (0)

Obamacare’s Demise Is a Looming Disaster for Mental Health

Republicans are on the cusp of undercutting the very mental health and substance abuse services they’ve promised. The post Obamacare’s Demise Is a Looming Disaster for Mental Health appeared first on WIRED.
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Obamacare’s Demise Is a Looming Disaster for Mental Health
January 15, 2017 2:20 pm|Comments (0)

Obamacare’s Demise Is a Looming Disaster for Mental Health

Republicans are on the cusp of undercutting the very mental health and substance abuse services they’ve promised. The post Obamacare’s Demise Is a Looming Disaster for Mental Health appeared first on WIRED.
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Flurry data shows Apple Watch and Android Wear may have spawned new interest in health apps
May 15, 2016 5:40 pm|Comments (0)


A new report from Flurry notes that of all the apps we have access to, those in the Health and Fitness categories on Google Play and in the App Store are the ones we rely on. Based on two metrics — use per week and 30-day retention — Flurry’s findings suggest health apps are only rivaled by weather or news. The lone failing of health apps is how often we tap into them, but that may be a poor metric to consider if we’re using wearables. With Apple Watch, the wearables market exploded along with apps for wearables. With a…

This story continues at The Next Web


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Health Tech Startup CliniCloud Secures $5M Seed Funding From Tencent
February 12, 2016 12:45 pm|Comments (0)

Going to the doctor and waiting for a short check-up can be frustrating and expensive. For common conditions like asthma or a cold, a stethoscope and thermometer are usually first used to make a diagnosis. But what if you could do it yourself from home?


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Health Tech Startup CliniCloud Secures $5M Seed Funding From Tencent
February 11, 2016 11:35 pm|Comments (0)

Going to the doctor and waiting for a short check-up can be frustrating and expensive. For common conditions like asthma or a cold, a stethoscope and thermometer are usually first used to make a diagnosis. But what if you could do it yourself from home?

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Health Tech Startup CliniCloud Secures $5M Seed Funding From Tencent
February 11, 2016 10:20 am|Comments (0)

Going to the doctor and waiting for a short check-up can be frustrating and expensive. For common conditions like asthma or a cold, a stethoscope and thermometer are usually first used to make a diagnosis. But what if you could do it yourself from home?

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