Tag Archives: Offices

How Open Plan Offices Kill Diversity and Equality
October 11, 2018 12:01 am|Comments (0)

Why are so many companies (i.e. so many top executives) embracing a strategy that’s so obviously unproductive and which employees almost universally dislike? 

I originally assumed the continued growth of open plan offices (now around 70% of all offices in the U.S.) was a victory of biz-blab over science–the corporate equivalent of anti-vaccination and climate change denial. However, since open plan offices are so obviously stupid, I’ve concluded there must be something deeper at work here–a hidden agenda.

What could it be?

A clue to this hidden agenda may lie in the undeniable fact that while executives want their employees to work in these open plan environments, they almost always secure private offices for themselves.

Another clue may lie in the way that the growth in open plan offices matches declines in work-from-home policies, private offices, and cubicle offices, all three of which offer varying levels of privacy for regular employees which open plan offices totally lack.

The unifying theme is that executives want employees to remain physically visible and constantly on display while simultaneously retaining their own right to remain invisible. This desire must be something that’s highly valuable to top management for them to be willing to pay such a huge tax in productivity and morale.

I’m not talking about a conspiracy. Nobody got together, twirled their metaphorical mustaches, and with a “brou-ha-ha-ha” decided to stick it to their employees. No, what’s operating here is something more subconscious, like confirmation bias. It’s a cultural thing and therefore largely unexamined, like most hidden agendas.

So, then, what deep need does the open plan office serve?

One obvious answer is the need to control the behavior of others–a need to which executives (who are often quite insecure about their ability to lead) are particularly susceptible.

However, while it is no doubt easier to control people when you can constantly look over their shoulders, that kind of monitoring can be done electronically. Since employees have no privacy rights, there’s nothing to stop companies from monitoring their behavior online. Big Brother doesn’t need to be physically present to stick his nose in your personal business.

If the deeper need is not a desire to control behavior, what could it be? Put another way, what benefit to executives get from making their employees physically visible while retaining the right to remain themselves invisible?

A well-documented effect of open plan offices is that constant visibility puts women at a disadvantage by forcing them to expend extra energy focusing on their physical appearance. However, it’s not just women who suffer from being forced into a fishbowl. Open plan environments also put at disadvantage those employees who are overweight, disabled, or in any way fail to conform to American standards of conventional attractiveness, i.e.young, thin, and light-skinned.

For example, open plan offices are vehemently hostile to older workers (Gen-X and above) because as one ages, it becomes increasingly difficult to achieve that cultural standard of conventional attractiveness.

Furthermore, some elements of open plan designs–such the ubiquitous workplace playground slide–are specifically intended to humiliate older workers. To a 20-year-old, using playground slide is merely embarrassing; to a 40-year-old it’s actively humiliating; to a 60-year-old, it’s a recipe for chiropractic appointment.

Rather than attracting millennials, open plan offices help top management eliminate or disempower workers who aren’t young, conventionally-attractive, generally light-skinned and male.–the exact demographic from whence sprang the majority of top managers. While such environments also tolerate young, conventionally-attractive females, the fishbowl-like characteristic of open plan offices guarantees that they’ll kept off-balance and “in their place” by being put constantly on display.

Seen this way, the open plan office, far from being a forward-looking vehicle to create collaboration and innovation, are actually only a manifestation of a traditional 20th century business culture which favors the dominance of older, light-skinned males, a dominance that expresses itself in everything from the demographics of Fortune 500 C-suites to the investment choices of venture capitalists.

That open plan offices tend to reinforce the patriarchy seems less surprising when you consider that the original concept of the open plan office dates not from the so-called “information age” but from the early years of 20th century, when companies–to increase paper-pushing efficiency–started arranging office workers’ desks inside large rooms called “bullpens.” 

Far from being a modern invention, open plan offices have been around for nearly 100 years. Within that history, companies have experimented with other workplace designs like private offices, cubicles, and telecommuting. Those experiments, however, fallen out of favor because those experiments gave employees more privacy, which was an assault on the status quo.

Companies have continued to embraced open plan designs not because they make employees more productive (they don’t) and not because employees find them inspiring places to work (they don’t) but because open plan offices reinforce the status quo–the same status quo that’s kept women and minorities out of positions of power, and that favors a younger, cheaper, more malleable workforce that’s less likely to challenge the dominance of the traditional powers-that-be.

Tech

Posted in: Cloud Computing|Tags: , , , , ,
INVESTOR ALERT: Investigation of Oracle Corporation Announced by Law Offices of Howard G …
June 11, 2016 6:10 pm|Comments (0)

The whistleblower complaint alleges that Oracle asked the manager to boost Oracle’s cloud computing revenue figures, and make the cloud …


RSS-4

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , , , , ,
Samsung says new U.S. offices are its ‘biggest investment in Silicon Valley’ to date
October 7, 2015 2:05 pm|Comments (0)

samsung-new-office-silicon-valley

Samsung officially opened the doors to its new 1.1-million-square-foot Silicon Valley offices Thursday, more than 30 years after its arrival in the San Jose tech corridor in 1983.

The building will house various research labs dedicated to semiconductors, LEDs and displays, staff in sales and marketing, and other support areas, the company said.

“[We are] laying the groundwork for a more aggressive pace of growth over the next several decades,” said Samsung’s chief executive, Dr. Oh-Hyun Kwon, at the grand opening ceremony.

Meanwhile, the company’s president of its U.S.-based device solutions operations, Jaesoo Han, said that the move “represents a major milestone as we open our most strategically important Samsung facility in the U.S., and also our biggest investment in Silicon Valley.”

samsung-office

Samsung also announced that it has established a $ 1 million STEM College Education Scholarship Fund. In its own words:

Deserving university students who are currently enrolled in STEM-focused programs at a California State or University of California school will benefit from this program, beginning with a $ 50,000 gift to San Jose State University this year. Each scholarship will cover tuition and living expenses for one year.

But the announcement of the new office has been largely overshadowed by news in virtual reality today: We reported that the Samsung Gear VR will launch as a consumer product this November for $ 99. (You can read our full roundup from today’s Oculus event here.)

Earlier this week, Samsung unveiled its new fonts-inspired Serif TVs, and shared more about how it relies on startups to stay ahead on technological innovation.

If you happen to be passing through the area, Samsung’s new building certainly looks worth checking out.

More information:

Powered by VBProfiles



Uncategorized

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Samsung says new U.S. offices are its ‘biggest investment in Silicon Valley’ to date
September 25, 2015 10:55 am|Comments (0)

samsung-new-office-silicon-valley

Samsung officially opened the doors to its new 1.1-million-square-foot Silicon Valley offices Thursday, more than 30 years after its arrival in the San Jose tech corridor in 1983.

The building will house various research labs dedicated to semiconductors, LEDs and displays, staff in sales and marketing, and other support areas, the company said.

“[We are] laying the groundwork for a more aggressive pace of growth over the next several decades,” said Samsung’s chief executive, Dr. Oh-Hyun Kwon, at the grand opening ceremony.

Meanwhile, the company’s president of its U.S.-based device solutions operations, Jaesoo Han, said that the move “represents a major milestone as we open our most strategically important Samsung facility in the U.S., and also our biggest investment in Silicon Valley.”

samsung-office

Samsung also said that it has established a $ 1 million STEM College Education Scholarship Fund. In its own words:

Deserving university students who are currently enrolled in STEM-focused programs at a California State or University of California school will benefit from this program, beginning with a $ 50,000 gift to San Jose State University this year. Each scholarship will cover tuition and living expenses for one year.

But the announcement of the new office has been largely overshadowed by news in virtual reality today: we reported that the Samsung Gear VR will launch as a consumer product this November for $ 99. (You can also read our roundup from that event here.)

Earlier this week, Samsung unveiled its new fonts-inspired Serif TVs, and shared more about how it relies on startups to stay ahead on technological innovation.

More information:

Powered by VBProfiles

Uncategorized

Link to this post!


RSS-5

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , , , , , ,