Tag Archives: Space

A Space Mystery Tied Up in a Bow
October 14, 2018 12:01 pm|Comments (0)

In 1670 an astronomer discovered a strange-shaped cloud in the sky. Upon further study over the next centuries, astronomers came around to the idea that CK Vulpeculae is the result of two stars colliding, although what types of stars crashed, they can’t say.

This massive cluster of galaxies, captured by the European Space Agency’s XMM-Newton space observatory, emits hot gases that glow purple in x-ray light. The galaxy cluster, called XLSSC006, contains hundreds of galaxies and dark matter, so much so that everything in it adds up to around 500 trillion solar masses. And this snapshot is of a bygone time; the image shows what XLSSC006 looked like when the 14 billion-year-old universe was but 9 billion years old.

Globular cluster NGC 1898 resides near the center of a dwarf galaxy called the Large Magellanic Cloud. It is of great interest to astronomers studying star formation because it is so close—a mere 163,000 light years away. Clusters like these—dense grouping of stars bound by gravity—date back to the early days of the universe, and they contain several hundred thousand, and sometimes millions, of stars.

While all terrestrial eyes were on Hurricane Michael, an astronaut aboard the International Space Station captured the storm from above on October 10, before Michael made landfall in Florida. The eye itself is calm enough that you can see down to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico, while the winds swirling around the center peaked at 155 miles per hour.

Every week, we look forward to gazing at new darkish, square-shaped images filled with striated light, shiny streams of gas, and a colorful assortment of galaxies. This image is more subdued. This skyward shot is from the European Space Agency’s Digitized Sky Survey 2, which is mapping the heavens using the European Southern Observatory. It’s remarkable for the amount of space it shows, that abundance of emptiness between all the astral bodies.

You are not seeing things, there aren’t a dozen space stations, just one. And in this composite photo, the International Space Station, the size of an NFL football field, appears almost like a gnat crawling across the face of the Sun. Many astrophotographers are skilled at capturing the ISS as it transits objects like the Sun and moon, and it’s something that takes great planning—they have to follow an object that is orbiting Earth at 18,000 miles an hour. That’s 5 miles per second!

Tech

Posted in: Cloud Computing|Tags: , ,
Space Photos of the Week: Mini-Moons Make Saturn’s Rings Extra Groovy
May 12, 2018 6:04 pm|Comments (0)

This lovely abstract image of Saturn’s rings is just one of the many unique photos captured by the Cassini spacecraft. The strong lines seem to intersect but they don’t actually—it’s the angle of the spacecraft and the tilt of the planet that create the illusion. Notice the thick black line that stretches horizontally? That is called the Encke Gap; it is kept open by one of Saturn’s tiniest and most famous moons, Pan. Take a very close look at the Encke Gap in the center of the image and there you will find Pan!

The Sun looks blue in this image on account of an ultraviolet filter that shows features more clearly. What stands out here is the active region in the center of the photo. These bright arcs show highly charged particles escaping from the Sun along magnetic field lines.

The Moon seems to float above Earth in this stunning image taken from the International Space Station on April 30. On our planet’s surface, what you see is Newfoundland, Canada, but what you should really be looking at is the bright blue of the atmosphere. It’s easy to forget how thin our atmosphere is—a delicate haze of clouds and water that separates us from the blackness of space.

The Hubble Space Telescope strikes again with this space-time bending almost-image of a galaxy cluster, called SDSS J0150+2725. You might think it’s the bright blue thing at the bottom, yet that is not the object at issue. Toward the top of the frame, light is being bent, distorting the shapes of galaxies that lie further off into the distance, and the culprit is the SDSS J0150+2725 galaxy cluster. While we can’t see the cluster itself, we can see how it affects the space around it. Galaxy clusters like these are some of the most massive objects in the universe, and they contain so much mass that they influence the gravity around them, warping space-time.

You are looking at a cluster of black holes. But we can’t see black holes, you say! You are right, but what we can see is nearby light being sucked into black holes. This is Sagittarius A, the supermassive black hole at the center our Milky Way galaxy. Scientists at the Chandra X-ray observatory captured this black hole cluster in a clever way: Neutron stars emit gas, and if they are locked into orbit with a black hole, that black hole will steal gas from the star, creating a trail of light that’s essentially a fingerprint marking its existence.

Welcome to space, Copernicus Sentinel-3B! This is the first image taken by the European Space Agency’s new satellite, launched to study Earth’s climate. Using its brand-new cameras, Sentinel-B captured sunset over Antarctica. The only daylight left is in the middle as the darkness of night creeps up from the bottom of the frame.

Last week the Sun opened up again. Seen here filtered through an extreme UV light filter, which shows very high-energy radiation, the darker region is an opening in the star’s magnetic field. These coronal holes spew highly charged particles called the solar wind. This sweeps out into space, eventually colliding with our own magnetic field, putting on a dazzling display of aurora for those near the north and south poles.

Tech

Posted in: Cloud Computing|Tags: , , , , , , ,
Space Photos of the Week: Light a Candle for Hubble, Still Gazing Strong
April 21, 2018 6:01 pm|Comments (0)

This isn’t just any Hubble photo of the Lagoon Nebula; this is a special birthday photo celebrating the Hubble Space Telescope’s 28 years in orbit. The Lagoon Nebula, seen here in dazzling color, is 4,000 light years away and is gargantuan as star nurseries go: 20 light years high and 55 light years wide.

This is a gorgeous photo and one you might not recognize of a famous astral body, called the Lagoon Nebula. The Hubble Space Telescope took this photo in infrared light, which reveals different elements of the nebula not seen in the visible spectrum. The bright star in the center is called Herschel 36 and is only 1 million years old—a fledgling in stellar terms.

Mars is covered in craters and while typically thought to be a “dead” planet, it’s actually quite active. Earth’s red neighbor has wind, although not strong enough to kill The Martian’s Mark Watney. This impact crater (a relatively new one by Mars standards) is called Bonestell crater, located in the plain known as Acidalia Planitia. The streaks in the image are caused by winds blowing down into the crater.

This photo of the Sun was taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamic Observatory some weeks ago. The dark regions are called coronal holes—openings in the Sun’s magnetic field—and when open, they spit highly charged particles into space. When these particles run into Earth’s magnetic field, they create spectacular displays of aurora near our northern and southern poles.

Hello deep space! This galaxy cluster has a name that is rather difficult to remember—PLCK G308.3-20.2, but it’s way cool. Galaxy clusters like this contain thousands of galaxies, some just like our own. They’re held together by gravity, making them one of the largest known structures in space affected by this invisible force.

Ready to shoot the moon? The new administration in Washington is setting its sights on some lunar adventures. Among the various reasons why people want to head back to the moon: There’s a decent amount of water frozen around our cratered satellite, and also the views from there aren’t too shabby.

Tech

Posted in: Cloud Computing|Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Trump's Call to Start a Space Force Tops This Week's Internet News Roundup
March 18, 2018 6:01 pm|Comments (0)

People look for inspiration and happiness in a vast array of places. Some see school kids walking out of class across America to take a stand for gun control and find hope. Others note that 7-Eleven now has customizable tater tots and are filled with joy. What do they get when they look at the internet? All that and a lot of bickering and tweets about calzones. Here, dear friends, is what everyone was talking about online last week when they weren’t talking about the new Avengers: Infinity War trailer.

Rex-It

What Happened: President Trump announced Rex Tillerson was being replaced as secretary of state on Twitter.

What Really Happened: Folks like to make jokes about Donald Trump running America via Twitter, but last week he announced an executive decision on the platform that was definitely not funny—at least not to the head of the State Department.

Yes, the change in Secretary of State—one of the most important, if not the most important, cabinet positions—was announced via social media, as if Trump was every parody of himself imaginable. For those who wanted more than just a tweet of notice about the new state of affairs, that was forthcoming … also via Twitter, of course.

Those around Tillerson, who had just arrived back in the country, were surprised by the news, suggesting that Tillerson himself wasn’t entirely prepared for what had just happened.

There might, it turns out, have been a reason for that, if one response from the State Department is to be believed.

OK, perhaps it was a little disingenuous to say that no one saw this coming, as some pointed out.

Unsurprisingly, the White House has a different take on the way everything went down.

Except, it turned out, chief of staff John Kelly’s message might not have been entirely clear.

There really is something to be said about Twitter’s role in all of this, isn’t there? Still, things couldn’t have been that bad, because Tillerson did make an appearance later that day to talk about his firing and smooth everything over.

OK, maybe it was kinda bad. (Tillerson’s failure to thank the president did not go unnoticed by, well, anyone.) Still, perhaps the split between Trump and Tillerson was for the best.

This is worth noting, as well. The State Department aide who put out the earlier statement saying that Tillerson didn’t know why he’d been fired? Yeah, there was a price to pay for saying that.

The Takeaway: Quick, we need a catchy way of talking about former Exxon CEO Tillerson now that he’s been ousted!

That’ll do.

Move Along, Nothing to See Here

What Happened: House Republicans announced they were closing their investigation into collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election, saying there was no evidence of such actions.

What Really Happened: Last week, with little warning, the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election just … stopped.

“Case closed”? Sure, if you say so. And, it turns out, they really did say so.

There are others who might disagree with that take, of course…

As news of the surprise closure started to go wide, it was perhaps worth turning to the ranking Democrat on the committee to see if he had anything to say about the whole thing.

That would be a yes, then. And, sure, it seems suspicious to say the least that the Republicans just shut down the investigation unfinished with so much still out there unanswered, but surely the Democrats on the committee were given adequate warning that the investigation was being closed, right?

OK, but at least all the Republicans are agreed that this move was the smart one?

Well, fine, yes, that’s a little awkward. Still, at least one of the leading Republicans on the committee didn’t disagree.

Oh, come on. As the week continued, it eventually started to become clear even to the Republicans that this had been a mistake, with this headline putting it best: “Republicans Fear They Botched Russia Report Rollout.” Gee, you think?

The Takeaway: In what could only be described as a spectacular piece of timing, the Republicans announced that there was nothing Russians had done in regards to the 2016 election in the same week that the Trump administration finally signed sanctions into law against 16 Russians for their efforts to interfere with the 2016 election. There’s nothing like being consistent.

Meanwhile, Over at the Department of Justice…

What Happened: Special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation took aim at the Trump Organization.

What Really Happened: Meanwhile, you might be thinking, “I wonder how special council Robert Mueller’s Russia collusion investigation is going? I’m sure that, if the House Republicans were right and there’s certainly nothing going on, he’ll be wrapping everything up too, right?” Funny story: He’s not wrapping everything up.

Yes, in what is pretty much the opposite of wrapping things up, Mueller is subpoenaing the Trump Organization’s records, which is … kind of a big deal, to say the least. Certainly, that’s what people on social media seemed to think.

But what could it all mean? Some people had theories.

And how is this going down with those targeted?

Somewhere, Devin Nunes is wandering around the halls of Congress, muttering to himself, “But I said nothing happened…!”

The Takeaway: It’s worth pointing out that the Mueller news dropped on March 15, which amused certain people online.

Oh, Canada

What Happened: Forget “Commander in Chief,” perhaps President Trump’s title could be “Gaslighter in Chief.” Or, maybe, “Man Who Should Perhaps Never Talk in Front of a Tape Recorder Ever.”

What Really Happened: This might sound like the kind of old-fashioned, unnecessary posturing of people stuck in the past, but once upon a time it was widely expected that the President of the United States wouldn’t be the kind of person who would boast about lying to the head of state of a friendly nation.

Those days, dear readers, are long gone.

Yes, the Washington Post obtained audio from a fundraising speech in which Trump boasted that he’d made up information that he used in an argument with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau over whether or not the US runs a trade deficit with Trudeau’s country. (It doesn’t.) “I had no idea,” Trump can be heard to say on the tape. “I just said, ‘You’re wrong.’ You know why? Because we’re so stupid.” As you might expect, people were thrilled about this display of, uh, political maneuvering? Sure, let’s go with that.

As the media struggled to understand what was happening, the White House press secretary attempted to smooth out the situation by, well, repeating the lie.

There is, also, a surreal second story to this audio of Trump that has nothing to do with lying to Justin Trudeau. Instead, it had to do with the “bowling ball test.”

As multiple outlets looked into the matter, it slowly emerged that it was probably all made up. Not to worry, though; according to the White House, it was just a joke.

The Takeaway: There’s really only response to this entire exchange, isn’t there?

Space Force? Space Force!

What Happened: When it comes to America’s manifest destiny, there’s only one direction left to go: To infinity… and beyond?

What Really Happened: With all the bad news going around the the White House, you can’t blame the president for wanting to change the narrative somehow. And you only get to do that, he knows, by thinking big and reaching for the stars. Last week, Trump gave a speech that showed just how literally he took that advice.

Sure, going to Mars is definitely thinking big, but is it thinking big enough? Not to worry, however; Trump was right there with the next big thing.

Space Force! Just the very idea got the media excited, and asking questions like, “For real?” and “What does that even mean?”, not to mention “Do we have to?” Sure, not every outlet took the idea seriously, but that’s the lamestream media for you. Everyone else was into the idea, or calling the president a laughingstock. It’s hard to be a leader. But at least Twitter understood the potential of Space Force.

SPACE FORCE!

The Takeaway: Make no mistake, people may joke now, but Space Force is the future.

Tech

Posted in: Cloud Computing|Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Orbital ATK to Launch Rocket to International Space Station on Saturday
November 11, 2017 12:00 am|Comments (0)

[unable to retrieve full-text content]

The International Space Station is getting some more supplies.

Aerospace company Orbital ATK said Friday that it plans to launch a rocket on Saturday that will help carry cargo to the International Space Station.

Orbital’s Antares rocket is expected to launch at 7:37 am ET from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Va. It will be Orbital’s eighth cargo-delivery mission to the International Space Station as part of the company’s contract with NASA.

The rocket will send aloft the cargo-carrying Cygnus spacecraft, which is expected to reach the space station on Nov. 13. The spacecraft will bring 7,400 pounds of supplies and scientific equipment, including a high-school student science experiment for studying how peanut plants grow in space.

We are set to launch our #OA8 #Antares carrying #Cygnus tomorrow morning! The 5-minute launch window will open at 7:37 am EST. https://t.co/A3W8PBbViO pic.twitter.com/EcGR93lO1X

— Orbital ATK (@OrbitalATK) November 10, 2017

The Cygnus spacecraft will remain at the International Space Station for one month, during which the cargo will help researchers conduct studies on how space’s microgravity affects the E.coli bacteria’s resistance to antibiotics. Another research experiment will test new technologies to allow for faster communications between people in space and on earth, according to NASA.

After debarking from the space station in December, the Cygnus spacecraft will burn up in Earth’s atmosphere, thus disposing of several tons of trash, NASA said.

People can watch a live broadcast of the rocket launch from NASA’s online video streaming website.

Orbital isn’t the only aerospace company helping NASA send cargo to the International Space Station. The Elon Musk-led SpaceX also has a NASA contract, and in August, it launched a Falcon 9 rocket to help bring 6,400 pounds of equipment, including a Hewlett Packard Enterprise hpe supercomputer, to the space station.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

In September, defense contractor giant Northrop Grumman noc said it plans to buy Orbital ATK for roughly $ 7.8 billion.

Tech

Posted in: Cloud Computing|Tags: , , , , , ,
Space Photos of the Week: Saturn, You So Pretty
August 12, 2017 2:45 pm|Comments (0)

Space Photos of the Week: Saturn, You So Pretty

A shadow on Saturn’s rings, a baby star, and shoebox-sized satellites. The post Space Photos of the Week: Saturn, You So Pretty appeared first on WIRED.
RSS-3

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , ,
Life’s Super Bowl Spot Proves That In Space, People Can Definitely Hear You Scream
February 5, 2017 12:05 am|Comments (0)

Hearing you loud and clear, Jake Gyllenhaal. Loud and clear.

Read more…


Uncategorized

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Space Photos of the Week: Dying Star Insists on Being Dramatic About It
October 16, 2016 2:17 am|Comments (0)

Space Photos of the Week: Dying Star Insists on Being Dramatic About It

Space photos of the week, September 18 — 24, 2016. The post Space Photos of the Week: Dying Star Insists on Being Dramatic About It appeared first on WIRED.
Uncategorized

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Space Photos of the Week: Watch It. This Star’s Bustin’ Out
June 15, 2016 2:50 pm|Comments (0)

Space Photos of the Week: Watch It. This Star’s Bustin’ Out

Space photos of the week, May 29–June 4, 2016. The post Space Photos of the Week: Watch It. This Star’s Bustin’ Out appeared first on WIRED.
RSS-3

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , , , , ,
IBM Aims to Tap the Fast-Growing CRM Space with Optevia
March 23, 2016 5:45 am|Comments (0)

The UK government launched G-Cloud in 2012 to promote adoption of cloud computing in the government sector. Optevia has said that its G-Cloud …

All articles

RSS-5

RSS-5

RSS-3


RSS-5

Posted in: Web Hosting News|Tags: , , ,