Tag Archives: Technologies

4 Lessons for Startups From the United Technologies Breakup and the End of the Conglomerate Era
December 3, 2018 12:01 pm|Comments (0)

This week, United Technologies (UTX) announced that the company is breaking itself into three, separating out its Otis and Carrier divisions from the core business. In doing so, UTX is following other industrial companies — including DuPont, GE and Honeywell — in undoing the era of mega conglomerates.

This begs the question: What has changed, and what does it mean for businesses today? The short answer is that today’s market is more demanding and segmented than ever before, and that mega corporations can’t keep up.

Here’s what growing companies can learn from watching the big guys fall down on the job of creating top shareholder value.

1. It’s hard to be all things to all people.

Before this move, United Technologies was making everything from helicopters to elevators, airplane engines and HVAC systems. That’s a broad range of technology to keep track of. Splitting the company up will make it possible for each new business to focus on its core area, set appropriate priorities and ultimately make the best decisions for each unique set of customers.

This statement by the company’s chairman and chief executive, Gregory J. Hayes, says it all: “Our decision to separate United Technologies is a pivotal moment in our history and will best position each independent company to drive sustained growth.” 

I know that in our own business, when we decided to scale back the number of services we offered and focus on a few core areas instead, our growth rate doubled within the next six months. We had underestimated the real costs and distractions of being in many different businesses.

2. Economies of scale are no longer paying off.

Historically, many mega conglomerates came into being to take advantage of bulk buying and shared resources. The rationale was cost savings and reduced overhead — but operational costs have come way down over time.

Cloud-based technology has reduced the need for companies to invest in servers and other hardware, which used to be a major expense. And many non-core functions can now be outsourced, including payroll, human resources, training, travel and information technology. In fact, the majority of our operational expenses at Acceleration Partners are on a per head or per seat basis today, there are very few fixed cost investments that we make.

Finally, marketing has moved away from big-budget print ads to online advertising, and sales are increasingly conducted online.

3. Specialization sells.

Customers — including business-to-business customers — increasingly use the internet to find exactly what they want at the price they want to pay. No longer blindly trusting of the biggest brands or best-known names, people today are looking for experts. They want more control and more choices than most giant companies are willing or able to provide.

Look at what has happened to television. More and more households today are cutting the cord on cable service, unwilling to pay for packages that include a lot of channels they don’t want. Instead, they are choosing to purchase only the apps and shows they want directly from content providers such as HBO and Hulu.

Similarly, in our industry, the agency of record (AOR) concept in which marketing agencies sell large integrated projects and then find other firms to deliver that work and mark up those services is quickly becoming obsolete.

4. Smaller organizations are more nimble.

The pace of business today is fast and getting faster. Large, bulky bureaucracies simply can’t keep up.

Look at how quickly Uber disrupted the entire U.S. taxi business. Markets evolve quickly, and companies need to be lean and nimble, not bogged down in the internal politics and exhaustive procedures so common to mega corporations.

It’s also way easier today to be small, since businesses can team up via a concept we at Acceleration Partners call “Performance Partnerships” — making deals with other companies to supply non-core functions, while collecting a commission or referral fee. A company can outsource marketing and sales, for example, or pass off the hassle of worrying about delivery and fulfillment — while keeping all its most critical functions in-house. As a study by Bain Capital has shown, companies benefit most when they divest themselves of non-core businesses and focus their time and capital on growth areas.

The bottom line is that today’s business landscape is no longer rewarding generalists — those companies that provided just-OK goods or services across a wide swath of areas. Companies today need to be best-in-class, responsive and 100 percent focused on the customer. That is the blueprint for success going forward.

Tech

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United Technologies Will Buy Rockwell Collins for $30 Billion
September 5, 2017 12:43 am|Comments (0)

Jet-engine maker United Technologies Corp has agreed to would buy aircraft parts manufacturer Rockwell Collins Inc for $ 30 billion, including debt, the companies said.

Under the deal, Rockwell shareholders will receive $ 140 per share in stock and cash, split between $ 93.33 in cash and $ 46.67 in United Tech stock, the companies said in a statement.

The offer represents an 18 premium to Rockwell’s closing share price on Aug. 3, the day before media reported that UTC was weighing a bid for Rockwell.

Under the deal, the companies said that Rockwell Collins and UTC’s aerospace systems segment will be combined to create a new business unit named Collins Aerospace Systems.

“This acquisition adds tremendous capabilities to our aerospace businesses and strengthens our complementary offerings of technologically advanced aerospace systems,” UTC’s chairman and chief executive officer, Greg Hayes, said in the statement.

“Together, Rockwell Collins and UTC Aerospace Systems will enhance customer value in a rapidly evolving aerospace industry by making aircraft more intelligent and more connected,” he said.

The deal, which includes $ 7 billion in Rockwell’s debt, is expected to save more than $ 500 million by the fourth year after its completion, the companies said.

Morgan Stanley & Co LLC was the financial adviser to United Tech and Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz was its legal adviser.

J.P. Morgan Securities LLC and Citigroup Global Markets Inc were Rockwell’s financial advisers, while Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom was its legal adviser.

Reporting by Yashaswini Swamynathan in Bengaluru; editing by Leslie Adler.

Tech

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eMazzanti Technologies Grows Azure Cloud Business 60X in 12 Months
July 8, 2016 5:30 am|Comments (0)

“eMazzanti’s commitment to customers and their shift to cloud computing is strategic and absolute,” said Ervis Zeqo, Business Development Manager, …


Cloud Computing

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Gartner’s 10 Strategic Technologies For Government, 2016 Include Internet of Things, Smart Machines
July 3, 2016 7:40 pm|Comments (0)

Gartner forecasts 25B IoT-based installed devices by 2020, with 6.8B alone in smart cities. Smart machines will become a catalyst of Industrie 4.0 adoption across global governments. Spending by national, federal and local governments worldwide on technology products and services is forecast to grow from $ 430.1B in 2016 to $ 476.1B by 2020.


Cloud Computing

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Emerging technologies and the future of business
October 27, 2015 11:50 pm|Comments (0)

However, the proliferation of cloud computing has shone a spotlight on how technology is enabling companies to be more agile. When CIOs and …


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