Tag Archives: Think

If You Don't Use These 4 Words, People Will Think You're Really Ignorant
November 8, 2018 12:00 pm|Comments (0)

Absurdly Driven looks at the world of business with a skeptical eye and a firmly rooted tongue in cheek. 

As the year begins to stagger to a close, you start to look around you, hoping that you’re still acceptable to the world.

Sometimes, it’s hard to know.

You’ve been working so hard. You’re been manically pursuing goals you wrote on a napkin in a particularly seedy bar.

And you still don’t remember how you got home from that bar.

Could it be, though, that those you work with think you’ve lost it?

Well, here’s a simple test. If you know — and use — the following five words, you’re still au fait with the world’s direction. 

If not, woe is you.

We’ll start with one that surely everyone knows: Floss.

Ah, but wait. This isn’t the meaning associated with slipping a piece of string between your teeth. 

Instead, it’s a little dance that people perform if they want to look especially silly. 

You performed it in that seedy bar, didn’t you? That’s a relief.

Alright, let’s move on to VAR

Yes, it’s easy to get your acronyms in a twist. VAR doesn’t stand for Variable Accounting Regimen. Nor is it Vineyard Arrest Record. 

Instead — surely you knew this — it’s Video Assistant Referee, the device that tries to help soccer referees make the correct decision and still manages to occasionally fail.

You must know Gammon.

No, it’s not something to do with meat. Some might say, however, that it’s something to do with meatheadedness. 

For the Collins definition is: “A person, typically male, middle-aged, and white, with reactionary views, especially one who supports the withdrawal of Britain from the European Union.”

Oh, you didn’t know? How reactionary of you.

Then there’s the most difficult of these words: Plogging.

No, I’d never heard of it either. It’s apparently the practice of jogging while picking up litter. Or picking up little while jogging.

But doesn’t stopping to pick up litter defeat the cumulative aerobic effects of jogging? 

I’m plogged if I know.

Finally — and the winner in Collins’ great race — is Single-Use.

Surely everyone knows and uses this. Well, at least once.

Single-Use describes the greatest scourge of our times, I’m told.

These are products that made to be used once and then thrown away. Yes, like T-shirts from H&M. 

Please don’t let that happen to you.

If you aren’t familiar with these five words, you, too, could be a one-year wonder, there to be thrown away by capricious rivals or recalcitrant employees. 

That might turn you into a Gammon.

Tech

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Delta Is Being Accused of Sneakily Tricking People Into Booking Much Worse Seats Than They Think
September 3, 2018 12:00 am|Comments (0)

Absurdly Driven looks at the world of business with a skeptical eye and a firmly rooted tongue in cheek. 

When I book flights, I try to be patient.

Perhaps like many people, I go to Kayak or Google Flights, and hope to find everything that’s available. 

Then, I might wait a few days to see if prices go up or down, depending on the urgency of my booking.

It’s like playing with your cat, really. Most of the time, Tibkins is quicker. Just occasionally, though, you get him. 

The accusation was that Delta Air Lines made ordinary Economy Class flights appear as if they were Premium Economy when booked via Google Flights.

Or, as the Points-Saving God puts it: “Delta displays economy prices for Virgin Atlantic Premium Economy, and at no point during booking does it actually specifically tell you you’ve got the wrong deal.”

In essence, if you go through the Google Flights search process, wanting to book, say, return flights from London to LAX, you get what seems like a wonderful deal.

If you book via Delta’s site rather than its partner Virgin Atlantic’s, that is.

The price difference is more than $ 1,000. Which is clearly the very definition of a steal.

Because you like saving money and feelings clever, you click on that deal and still believe you’re booking Premium Economy.

It’s just that, if you look closely, it has a novel and delightful name: Economy Delight.

This is actually Virgin’s fancy name for something that’s slightly better than so-called Economy Classic, but is still very much Economy Class and not the wider seats and more pleasant experience of Premium Economy.

Which Virgin calls, oddly, Premium Economy.

For all you know, however, Economy Delight is what Delta calls Premium Economy.

There are so many names these days.

And nowhere, said God Save The Points, is it clear that it isn’t. After all, why are you being shown this option when you searched for Premium Economy fares?

I asked Delta for its view.

An airline spokeswoman told me: 

Delta recognizes the limitations of some current shopping experience on third-party sites may not be ideal. That’s why we are leading industry collaboration to ensure customers have access to all of Delta’s products, no matter where they shop.

Ah, so it’s Google Flights’ fault?

Delta seems to think so. Its spokeswoman continued: 

It’s time for third-party displays, including Google Flights, to invest in the technology necessary to display the various products available so customers can view all their options clearly, just as Delta has done for customers on delta.com. 

An airline mocking Google’s technology? That resembles entertainment.

So I asked the Silicon Valley company for its reaction and will update, should I hear.

I remained perplexed. If Virgin Atlantic’s fares are accurately depicted, why aren’t Delta’s?

I was so moved by all this that I tried the search for myself.

I got very similar results to God Save The Points. 

Not exactly close.

I clicked through to Delta’s site and there it was, the Economy Delight designation.

Only if I scrolled down would I see that an upgrade to Premium Economy would cost an additional $ 257.75 each way.

This all feels a touch unhealthy. 

Delta says it’s the champion of the people, but airlines aren’t always so keen to play with third-party sites, where many people go to make comparisons.

Risibly, the airlines’ lobbying group claims this is all intended to increase, please wait for it, transparency.

It might even, say the comparison sites’ lobbyists, threaten the ability of fare comparison sites to operate.

Worse, the airlines seem to believe that third-party sites should deliver all the detailed information that airlines have, yet those same airlines refuse, in some cases, to give those sites that very information.

Which all should make emptors do a lot of caveating.

And we thought technology is going to make things easier. 

Easier for corporations, perhaps.

Tech

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What Separates Millionaire Entrepreneurs From The Rest Of Us? Hint: It's Not What You Think
July 7, 2018 6:37 am|Comments (0)

At the end of the day, who doesn’t love a shortcut?

But there’s a trap in this approach that most people don’t realize.

Simply copying their strategies and tactics alone won’t work. You need to first understand the mindset behind what they do.

I’ll tell you, I see people making this mistake all the time. They discover that the big dog of their industry generates 80% of leads using Facebook ads. So guess what they do? They copy their ads and expect it to work.

After spending a few hundred bucks and not seeing any results, they turn their ads down and never touch it again. “I always knew that Facebook ads don’t work for my audience.” Seriously?

What those folks don’t understand is that the guys who made it work for them have a completely different mindset. They focus on learning and experiment with several different variations until they find the one that works.

You see what I mean? It all comes back to your mindset.

Now, I’ve recently interviewed several multimillion-dollar business owners in my podcast, and I sat down with my team to analyze how these successful entrepreneurs think differently.

Here are three key mindsets that you can copy:

1.  Put all your eggs into one basket

The average entrepreneur tends to struggle with what’s known as Shiny Object Syndrome. They try to do everything at once — we’re talking multiple product lines, income streams, and business opportunities.

Millionaires, on the other hand, put all their eggs in one basket. They give the current project they’re working on their 100% — no ifs, ands, or buts.

I’m not going to lie – I fell prey to the Shiny Object Syndrome back when I first started my company, too. I thought that the best way of making money was to sell whatever my clients needed — as long as they were willing to pay, I was willing to do the job.

One day, I was talking to a successful business owner, and he told me to stop running around like a headless chicken and to focus my attention on a single project. I took his advice, and my revenue shot through the roof.

2. Look for the root of your problems

Here’s another way in which successful entrepreneurs think differently…

They look past the superficial and focus on the root of their problems — this helps them solve their problems with ease.

When I encounter a problem, for example, I like to use the 5 Whys technique to identify the underlying issue. This is pretty simple; all you need to do is to ask “Why?” 5 times.

Say you’re not hitting your quarterly revenue target.

Why? Because you don’t have enough sales.

Why? Because you don’t have enough leads.

Why? Because the marketing team hasn’t generated enough leads.

Why? Because the marketing team is unaware that more leads are required.

Why? Because there’s a lack of communication between sales and marketing.

Bingo — you’ve now gotten to the root of your problem.

3. Progress over perfection

Last but not least, the average entrepreneur aims for perfection over progress, and they feel as though everything has to be in place before they make a decision.

On the other hand, successful entrepreneurs are comfortable with moving a project forward even when the conditions aren’t perfect. They’d rather try and fail (and learn something in the process), rather than not give it a shot.

One of our coaching clients, unfortunately, is one of those guys who’s trapped by his own need for perfection. He’s making 7 figures per year, which is a great start — but because he’s obsessed with getting things perfect, he’s become his own bottleneck. This guy’s business has since stagnated, and unless he changes his mindset, he won’t be able to grow.

As entrepreneurs, we typically look for tangible solutions that we can implement immediately. But keep this in mind: at the end of the day, it’s how you implement these strategies and work past your challenges that determines if you succeed or not. Remember, it’s all about the mindset.

Tech

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