Tag Archives: Warning

TSMC's smartphone warning points squarely at Apple: analysts
April 19, 2018 6:05 pm|Comments (0)

(Reuters) – Shares in Apple Inc (AAPL.O) and its suppliers fell on Thursday after a raft of analysts read a prediction of softer smartphone sales from Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co Ltd (2330.TW) as driven chiefly by concern about demand for iPhones.

FILE PHOTO: A logo of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co (TSMC) is seen at its headquarters in Hsinchu, Taiwan October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Eason Lam/File Photo

TSMC, the world’s largest contract chipmaker and a major Apple supplier, revised its full-year revenue target to the low end of its earlier forecast.

“Apple represents nearly 20 percent of TSMC’s revenue so the outlook potentially points to weaker-than-anticipated iPhone demand,” Atlantic Equities analyst James Cordwell told Reuters.

Others, some asking not to be quoted, said baldly that the warning was “exactly” about Apple.

Mizuho Securities USA said in a client note that its checks continue to point to soft demand for iPhone X, the Cupertino-based firm’s tenth anniversary phone released last November, in addition to a steady fall in iPhone 8 and 8 Plus orders.

Apple’s shares were last down 2.5 percent and were the biggest drag on the tech-heavy Nasdaq index.

Shares of Apple suppliers including Qualcomm Inc (QCOM.O), Intel Corp (INTC.O), Qorvo Inc (QRVO.O), Skyworks Solutions Inc (SWKS.O) and Broadcom Inc (AVGO.O) fell by 2 percent to 5 percent.

“Until the new iPhones in the Fall start driving the production food chain in Q3, mobile’s going to be weak,” Elazar Advisors analyst Chaim Siegel said.

TSMC, also a supplier to Qualcomm and Nvidia Corp (NVDA.O), said it expects growth this year of 5 percent for the global semiconductor industry, weaker than an earlier forecast of 5-7 percent.

Data provider TrendForce had earlier estimated 2018 global smartphone production at around 1.5 billion units, 2.8 percent up on 2017 but down from a previously expected 5 percent.

TSMC on Thursday estimated 8 percent growth for contract chipmakers, compared with its previous forecast of 9-10 percent.

U.S.-listed shares of TSMC (TSM.N) were down 6 percent, while other chip equipment makers such as Applied Materials Inc (AMAT.O) and Lam Research Corp (LRCX.O) fell about 5 percent and ASML Holding NV (ASML.O) lost 3.6 percent.

Another big industry bellwether, chip equipment maker Lam Research, said on Wednesday its shipments missed consensus estimates for the first time in five years.

Chipmakers Analog Devices Inc (ADI.O), Micron Technology (MU.O) and Xilinx Inc (XLNX.O) were also down by 3 percent to 4 percent.

Reporting by Sonam Rai in Bengaluru; Editing by Maju Samuel and Patrick Graham

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'This Is Not a Drill.' Thank God The False Alarm Missile Warning in Hawaii Happened on a Weekend, But It's a Warning for the Entire Country
January 14, 2018 6:00 am|Comments (0)

Virtually the entire state of Hawaii was in a panic Saturday, after the state emergency management agency warned that a ballistic missile was “INBOUND,” and that people should “SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER.”

“THIS IS NOT A DRILL,” said the message, complete with ALL CAPS. It was delivered all over. Words can’t do justice. Scroll down and you’ll see video.

Oh, but it was all a very big mistake. 

If there is any bright side, maybe it’s that it all happened on a Saturday. No commuters, no school kids separated from their families–no financial markets, so the stock market didn’t crash. (Weekend or not, thank God the United States didn’t launch any kind of retaliatory attack.)

Take a look at the Twitter embeds below, showing a little bit about what it was like to live through this. (If the embeds don’t show, click through to the links.)

1. Robotic radio warning of “incoming ballistic missile.” 

2. Broadcasting live on Periscope at the exact moment.

Captured live.

3. What it looked like on a phone.

Imagine getting this alert–with no way of knowing it was a false alarm.

4. What it looked like if you were watching television in Hawaii.

This is terrifying.”

5. Human reaction.

“My mom and sister were crying. It was a false alarm, but betting a lot of people are shaken.”

6. More human reaction.

“In one moment our lives changed completely, yes it was false, yes we’re alive. But this ruined me. My babies are 5 and 2months old they have their whole life ahead of them and here I sat with them in my arms saying sorry I tried to protect you the best I could.”

7. Live from the airport.

“My friend and ABC newsreader @JulianBAbbott was at Honolulu airport when the missile alert text message was sent out across #Hawaii. He’s about to board now but this is what he told me about what unfolded. *thread*”

8. This golfer who decided he’d die on the fairway.

Worth watching. “My father will live and die golfing.” #missile #hawaii

9. Sorry about that. 

From U.S. Pacific Command: “…no ballistic missile threat to #Hawaii. Earlier message was sent in error and was a false alarm.

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Dialog shares tumble on warning Apple could build its own chips
December 4, 2017 12:24 pm|Comments (0)

LONDON/FRANKFURT (Reuters) – Dialog Semiconductor said on Monday top customer Apple could build its own power-management chips into future iPhones rather than rely on the Anglo-German chipmaker, sending its shares plunging as much as 19 percent.

Dialog semiconductor logo is pictured at a company building in Germering near Munich, Germany August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

The company, which analysts reckon derives more than half of its revenue from Apple, said there was no risk to its existing supply deals in 2018 and it was in the advanced stages of working with Apple on designing “2019-type products” that could lead to commercial contracts by next March.

“Our position remains that we have seen no material change to our ongoing relationship with Apple Inc,” Chief Executive Jalal Bagherli told investors on a conference call.

However, the company acknowledged for the first time that “Apple has the resources and capability to internally design a PMIC and could potentially do so in the next few years.”

PMICs are power-management integrated circuits that are vital to conserve battery life in products like Apple iPhones.

Investors are wary of companies that rely heavily on Apple, which has cut out several small suppliers in the past.

The U.S. technology giant said in April it planned to replace graphics chip supplier Imagination Technologies, sending its shares down 70 percent in a single session. Imagination was subsequently sold off in two separate deals.

The Nikkei business daily last week quoted one source as saying Apple would make about half the iPhone’s power-management chips starting next year, with another source saying this could be delayed to 2019. (s.nikkei.com/2Al5nSl)

Since then, Dialog shares have lost nearly a third of their value. At 1035 GMT, they were down 15.2 percent at 26.47 euros.

Bagherli said Apple’s feedback so far on 2019 product plans had been “very good” and that he expected to have more clarity by March on the terms of new business from Apple for 2019. Dialog would update investors when it had more details, he said.

Semiconductor suppliers are typically barred by Apple from revealing their supply relationships. Dialog, which has previously declined to name Apple, referring to it only obliquely as its “largest customer” or its “main business”, said it had received a special dispensation from Apple to mention it.

Dialog emphasized it “does not have reason to believe its current expectations of 2018 Apple business would be impacted” should Apple decide to design the chips itself.

Dialog, itself heavily reliant on the smartphone industry, said it was aware that in order to remain a key supplier to Apple it would have to continue to meet the U.S. company’s “technology, quality, price and volume expectations”.

The slide in its shares echoed one in April, after Bankhaus Lampe analyst Karsten Iltgen advised investors to sell the stock because Apple was working on its own battery-saving chip. The stock is off more than 40 percent since then.

($ 1 = 0.8434 euros)

Additional reporting by Ludwig Burger in Frankfurt; Editing by Edmund Blair and Mark Potter

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Smartphone addicts get street warning signs in South Korea
June 26, 2016 2:20 am|Comments (0)

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Smartphones can be dangerous. Not because they may potentially cause cancer (that’s a valid concern), but because people are so glued to them and often not looking at what they’re walking into on the street.

With the help of the National Police Agency, Seoul, South Korea’s Metropolitan Government is taking preventive measures to warn the city’s citizens to be more aware of their surroundings when using their smartphones.

The Seoul government unveiled two traffic signs as a part of a pilot program, which you can see below. One sign, “Warning: Using Smartphone while Walking,” is for warning pedestrians about the dangers of getting hit by a car while using a smartphone while crossing the street. Read more…

More about Safety, Warning Signs, Signs, Asia, and Smartphones


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