Tag Archives: Week

This Week In Money – December 29, 2018
December 30, 2018 12:01 pm|Comments (0)

Produced by HoweStreet.com

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This Week In Money – December 1, 2018
December 2, 2018 12:01 pm|Comments (0)

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Spotify Is Rolling Out Its Official Apple Watch App This Week
November 14, 2018 12:00 am|Comments (0)

Spotify is delivering on its promise to release a music-streaming app for the Apple Watch after testing a beta version of the app earlier this month.

With the new app, Spotify users can use an Apple Watch to control music, favorite songs playing on a connected iPhone, and choose which device to play songs on. Some features are still missing, however, such as downloading songs to play offline. And Apple Watches with built-in 4G LTE can’t stream music to wireless headphones, a feature that would appeal to music-loving runners.

Part of the appeal Apple imagined the Watch having was to avoid having to pull a smartphone out of a pocket to control an app’s functions. Streaming music is tailor-made for such a device, as listeners frequently want to change volume, switch tracks, or move around playlists.

“With this new app, users can enjoy an improved experience with better control and the ability to seamlessly connect to your speakers or devices,” Spotify said in a statement announcing the app. “The new integration with Apple Watch makes accessing your recently played songs simple, even with your phone in your pocket.”

Spotify is the most popular music app, with more than 190 million users. Apple Music has been growing quickly, however, having a user base of more than 50 million users. Releasing a Spotify app for the Apple Watch may strengthen the music service’s appeal among Apple’s loyal customers.

Spotify said it will be rolling out the new app to Apple Watch owners during the coming week. Spotify users will need to install the latest iPhone version of Spotify from the App Store.

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Weighing The Week Ahead: How Will The Midterm Elections Affect Financial Markets?
October 28, 2018 12:00 pm|Comments (0)

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Space Photos of the Week: Mini-Moons Make Saturn’s Rings Extra Groovy
May 12, 2018 6:04 pm|Comments (0)

This lovely abstract image of Saturn’s rings is just one of the many unique photos captured by the Cassini spacecraft. The strong lines seem to intersect but they don’t actually—it’s the angle of the spacecraft and the tilt of the planet that create the illusion. Notice the thick black line that stretches horizontally? That is called the Encke Gap; it is kept open by one of Saturn’s tiniest and most famous moons, Pan. Take a very close look at the Encke Gap in the center of the image and there you will find Pan!

The Sun looks blue in this image on account of an ultraviolet filter that shows features more clearly. What stands out here is the active region in the center of the photo. These bright arcs show highly charged particles escaping from the Sun along magnetic field lines.

The Moon seems to float above Earth in this stunning image taken from the International Space Station on April 30. On our planet’s surface, what you see is Newfoundland, Canada, but what you should really be looking at is the bright blue of the atmosphere. It’s easy to forget how thin our atmosphere is—a delicate haze of clouds and water that separates us from the blackness of space.

The Hubble Space Telescope strikes again with this space-time bending almost-image of a galaxy cluster, called SDSS J0150+2725. You might think it’s the bright blue thing at the bottom, yet that is not the object at issue. Toward the top of the frame, light is being bent, distorting the shapes of galaxies that lie further off into the distance, and the culprit is the SDSS J0150+2725 galaxy cluster. While we can’t see the cluster itself, we can see how it affects the space around it. Galaxy clusters like these are some of the most massive objects in the universe, and they contain so much mass that they influence the gravity around them, warping space-time.

You are looking at a cluster of black holes. But we can’t see black holes, you say! You are right, but what we can see is nearby light being sucked into black holes. This is Sagittarius A, the supermassive black hole at the center our Milky Way galaxy. Scientists at the Chandra X-ray observatory captured this black hole cluster in a clever way: Neutron stars emit gas, and if they are locked into orbit with a black hole, that black hole will steal gas from the star, creating a trail of light that’s essentially a fingerprint marking its existence.

Welcome to space, Copernicus Sentinel-3B! This is the first image taken by the European Space Agency’s new satellite, launched to study Earth’s climate. Using its brand-new cameras, Sentinel-B captured sunset over Antarctica. The only daylight left is in the middle as the darkness of night creeps up from the bottom of the frame.

Last week the Sun opened up again. Seen here filtered through an extreme UV light filter, which shows very high-energy radiation, the darker region is an opening in the star’s magnetic field. These coronal holes spew highly charged particles called the solar wind. This sweeps out into space, eventually colliding with our own magnetic field, putting on a dazzling display of aurora for those near the north and south poles.

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Space Photos of the Week: Light a Candle for Hubble, Still Gazing Strong
April 21, 2018 6:01 pm|Comments (0)

This isn’t just any Hubble photo of the Lagoon Nebula; this is a special birthday photo celebrating the Hubble Space Telescope’s 28 years in orbit. The Lagoon Nebula, seen here in dazzling color, is 4,000 light years away and is gargantuan as star nurseries go: 20 light years high and 55 light years wide.

This is a gorgeous photo and one you might not recognize of a famous astral body, called the Lagoon Nebula. The Hubble Space Telescope took this photo in infrared light, which reveals different elements of the nebula not seen in the visible spectrum. The bright star in the center is called Herschel 36 and is only 1 million years old—a fledgling in stellar terms.

Mars is covered in craters and while typically thought to be a “dead” planet, it’s actually quite active. Earth’s red neighbor has wind, although not strong enough to kill The Martian’s Mark Watney. This impact crater (a relatively new one by Mars standards) is called Bonestell crater, located in the plain known as Acidalia Planitia. The streaks in the image are caused by winds blowing down into the crater.

This photo of the Sun was taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamic Observatory some weeks ago. The dark regions are called coronal holes—openings in the Sun’s magnetic field—and when open, they spit highly charged particles into space. When these particles run into Earth’s magnetic field, they create spectacular displays of aurora near our northern and southern poles.

Hello deep space! This galaxy cluster has a name that is rather difficult to remember—PLCK G308.3-20.2, but it’s way cool. Galaxy clusters like this contain thousands of galaxies, some just like our own. They’re held together by gravity, making them one of the largest known structures in space affected by this invisible force.

Ready to shoot the moon? The new administration in Washington is setting its sights on some lunar adventures. Among the various reasons why people want to head back to the moon: There’s a decent amount of water frozen around our cratered satellite, and also the views from there aren’t too shabby.

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This Week in the Future of Cars: Working Through the Chaos
April 6, 2018 6:01 pm|Comments (0)

About 8 months ago, Tesla CEO Elon Musk warned his troops that building the Model 3 would require “production hell.” For once, the man known to sometimes be a bit too optimistic about timelines nailed it. Last year’s Tesla’s production numbers were dismal; now, according to numbers released this week, they’re looking up.

Meanwhile, WIRED’s Transpo team explored why self-driving car crashes look different from human ones; how the electric car could fare after Environmental Protection Agency rolled back fuel economy standards this week; and why an electronic logging rule has truckers shaking their horn-honking fists at the Trump administration.

It was a messy week. Let’s get you caught up.

Headlines

Stories you might have missed from WIRED this week

  • Last Friday night, Tesla announced that its Autopilot feature was activated when a Model X carrying driver Wei Huang crashed into a highway barrier last week, killing him. As senior writer Jack Stewart reports, the crash comes amidst a wider debate about the role of humans in semiautonomous vehicles. Should engineers ever expect (imperfect) to compensate for (imperfect) tech?

  • EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt went ahead and rolled back rules that would have forced the auto industry to nearly double 2012’s fuel economy standards by 2025. But transportation editor Alex Davies explains why there’s still hope for electric vehicles: China’s aggressive electric vehicle quotas and environment-loving millennials.

  • When a video showing the fatal collision between a self-driving Uber and a woman on an Arizona road came out, it almost made sense at first—of course the car didn’t see the pedestrian on a darkened road. But as I discovered, self-driving car crashes and fender-benders don’t look like human crashes. Car software can miss things that seem obvious to humans, and yet also prevent collisions that look downright unpreventable.

  • Tesla’s last week of the first quarter looked pretty good, Model-3-production-wise. But as Jack reports, the electric carmaker still needs to bring consistency to its production line.

  • Contributor Nick Stockton reports on the hottest topic at this year’s Mid-American Trucking Show: electronic logging devices. The tech, now required by law, replaces the pen and paper logging systems that truckers have used to keep track of their hours for decades. But truckers aren’t happy with the new system—and had hoped the Trump administration would fix it.

Educational Work Distraction of the Week

If your goal is to waste time like a WIRED transportation staff writer, have I got a tip for you. Streetmix lets the armchair urban planner fuss about with the elements of the city street, adding bike lanes, bus lanes, sidewalks, parklets, and streetcars as they see fit. The game—created by Code for America whizzes back in 2014—is a good reminder of the tradeoffs that cities face every day. Because there’s only so much street space!

Required Reading

News from elsewhere on the internet

In the Rearview

Essential stories from WIRED’s canon

Last year, when the Trump administration swept into Washington, Alex anticipated the conversation we’d be having today: Can the federal government really roll back pollution regulations? As he explained then, it will have a hard time—and it’s all because of California.

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Tesla says produced 2,020 Model 3 sedans last week
April 3, 2018 6:06 pm|Comments (0)

(Reuters) – Tesla Inc sought to squash any speculation it might need to raise more capital this year on Tuesday, driving the company’s battered shares higher as it announced it built 2,020 of its cheaper Model 3 sedans in the last seven days.

The company’s reassurance that it does not need extra cash sent a wave of relief through investors who sold shares of the electric carmaker through a week of bad news about its credit rating and semi-autonomous driving technology.

In early trade on Tuesday, Tesla shares jumped as much as 6.9 percent, recouping a third of the past week’s losses. They were up 3.2 percent at $ 260 in midday trade.

Musk’s $ 50-billion dollar venture said it would also churn out 2,000 of the Model 3 cars next week and promised output would climb rapidly through the second quarter.

“Tesla continues to target a production rate of approximately 5,000 units per week in about three months, laying the groundwork for Q3 to have the long-sought ideal combination of high volume, good gross margin and strong positive operating cash flow,” the company said in a filing.

“As a result, Tesla does not require an equity or debt raise this year, apart from standard credit lines.”

Jefferies analysts had estimated that Tesla needed $ 2.5 billion to $ 3 billion of fresh equity to fund the Model 3 rampup and several other Wall Street brokerages have predicted the company would need more funds this year.

Some analysts said there were signs that the company might have prioritized the cheaper car, seen as crucial to its profitability, over its Model X SUV and more-established and expensive Model S sedan.

Tesla said first-quarter deliveries totaled 29,980 vehicles, out of which 11,730 were Model S and 10,070 were Model X.

Both were lower from the previous quarter and the first quarter a year ago.

“Maybe Elon Musk switched staff from Model S and X to Model 3 to get better production numbers for Model 3,” said analyst Frank Schwope from NORD/LB.

Musk himself has taken direct control of Model 3 production and the company says it already has about 500,000 advance reservations from customers for the car.

FILE PHOTO: A Tesla Model 3 sedan, its first car aimed at the mass market, is displayed during its launch in Hawthorne, California, U.S. March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Joe White/File Photo

The Model 3 is the most affordable of Tesla’s cars to date and is the only one capable of transforming the niche automaker into a mass producer amid a sea of rivals entering the nascent electric vehicle market.

Tesla’s consistent failure to meet its production targets – it had promised 2,500 Model 3s would roll off its assembly lines per week by the end of March – has made Wall Street broadly more skeptical about Musk’s promises.

Several criticized as “tone deaf” an April Fool’s tweet from the billionaire that joked his company, which has $ 10 billion in debt, was “totally bankrupt”.

Tesla shares peaked at $ 389 last September and have been declining steadily since.

Analysts, however, are giving the company the benefit of the doubt as a big bet on the future of high-tech electric and self-driving vehicles.

The production numbers, while short of Tesla’s own target, are far above the 793 Model 3s built in the final week of last year.

“The company appears to be near the point of turning the corner on meeting guidance and production performance,” said William Selesky from Argus Research.

FILE PHOTO: A Tesla dealership is seen in West Drayton, just outside London, Britain, February 7, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/File Photo

(Corrects to show production was for last seven days, not last seven days of March, in paragraph one)

Reporting By Alexandria Sage and Sonam Rai; Additional reporting by Munsif Vengattil; Editing by Patrick Graham, Bernard Orr

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Tesla said to make 2,000 Model 3s per week, stock down
April 2, 2018 6:05 pm|Comments (0)

(Reuters) – Tesla Inc (TSLA.O) was reported to be making 2,000 of its Model 3 sedans per week, enough to ease stock market nerves around billionaire Elon Musk’s electric carmaker on Monday after a week dominated by news of a crash involving its semi-autonomous autopilot.

Musk told employees in a company-wide email on Monday that Tesla had just passed the 2,000 per week rate, according to auto website Jalopnik.

That was short of its 2,500 per week target but a big increase on the 793 Model 3s that the company built in the final week of last year. It produced 2,425 of the cars in the whole fourth quarter. [nL4N1OY42A

Slideshow (2 Images)

Tesla shares recovered from an 8 percent loss before the Jalopnik report filtered into markets to trade down 3.5 percent on the day. bit.ly/2uFdEBr

The company did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Jalopnik also quoted Musk in the email to employees as saying: “If things go as planned today, we will comfortably exceed that number over a seven day period!”

Reporting by Sonam Rai in Bengaluru, Editing by Peter Henderson and Patrick Graham

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Trump to unveil China tariff list this week, targeting tech goods
April 2, 2018 6:00 am|Comments (0)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Trump administration this week will unveil the list of Chinese imports targeted for U.S. tariffs to punish Beijing over technology transfer policies, a move expected to intensify trade tensions between the world’s two largest economies.

U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks on the Infrastructure Initiative at the Local 18 Richfield Training Site in Richfield, Ohio, U.S., March 29, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

The list of $ 50 billion to $ 60 billion worth of annual imports is expected to target “largely high-technology” products and it may be more than two months before tariffs take effect, administration officials have said.

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office needs to unveil the list of products by Friday under President Donald Trump’s China tariff proclamation signed on March 22.

The tariffs are aimed at forcing changes to Chinese government policies that USTR says results in the “uneconomic” transfer of U.S. intellectual property to Chinese companies.

The agency’s “Section 301” investigation authorizing the tariffs alleges China has systematically sought to misappropriate U.S. intellectual property through joint venture requirements, unfair technology licensing rules, purchases of U.S. technology firms with state funding and outright theft.

China has denied that its laws require technology transfers and has threatened to retaliate against any U.S. tariffs with trade sanctions of its own, with potential targets such as U.S. soybeans, aircraft or heavy equipment.

On Sunday, Beijing slapped extra tariffs of up to 25 percent on 128 U.S. products including frozen pork, as well as wine and certain fruits and nuts in response to steep U.S. tariffs on imports of aluminum and steel announced last month by the Trump administration.

Fears have arisen that the two countries will spiral into a trade war that will crush global growth.

TARGETING ‘MADE IN CHINA 2025’

U.S. technology industry officials said they expected the Trump administration’s list to target products that benefit from Beijing’s “Made in China 2025” program, which aims to upgrade the country’s domestic manufacturing base with more advanced products.

The state-led program targets 10 strategic industries for replacing imports with Chinese-made products: advanced information technology, robotics, aircraft, shipbuilding and marine engineering, advanced rail equipment, new energy vehicles, electrical generation equipment, agricultural machinery, pharmaceuticals and advanced materials.

“Foreign technology acquisition through various means remains a prime focus under Made in China 2025 because China is still catching up in many of the areas prioritized for development,” USTR said in its report justifying the tariffs.

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer has said that preserving America’s technological edge is “the future of the U.S. economy.”

Reports that the tariff list may also include consumer goods such as clothing and footwear drew strong protests from U.S. business groups, which argued that it would raise prices for U.S. consumers.

LIMITED TIME FOR TALKS

While there have been contacts between senior members of the Trump administration and their Chinese counterparts since Trump announced his intention to impose tariffs, there has been little evidence of intensive negotiations to forestall them.

“The administration is following the Japan model from the 1980s,” said a tech industry executive. “They’ll publish a Federal Register notice of tariffs on certain products, then try to reach a negotiated settlement over the next 60 days.”During his first stint at USTR in the Reagan administration, Lighthizer employed similar tactics to win voluntary Japanese export restraints on steel and autos.

Wendy Cutler, a former deputy USTR in charge of Asia negotiations, said that addressing the sweeping intellectual property allegations identified by USTR would require major changes to China’s industrial policy. A 60-day settlement may not be realistic in that case.

“I think they’ve set up a high bar for what they need to achieve, in order not to impose these types of tariffs and investment restrictions,” Cutler said.

Reporting by David Lawder; Editing by Peter Cooney

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