Tag Archives: Wireless

Top U.S. antitrust official uncertain of need for four wireless carriers
June 1, 2018 6:11 pm|Comments (0)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The head of the U.S. Justice Department’s antitrust division, Makan Delrahim, declined on Friday to support the Obama administration’s firm backing of the need for four U.S. wireless carriers.

FILE PHOTO: A man uses a smartphone in New York City, in this picture taken November 6, 2013. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Asked about T-Mobile’s plan to buy Sprint for $ 26 billion, Delrahim declined to reiterate the view of President Barack Obama’s enforcers, who had said that four wireless carriers were needed.

Instead, Delrahim told reporters, “I don’t think there’s any magical number that I’m smart enough to glean.”

He also said the department would look at the companies’ arguments that the proposed merger was needed for them to build the next generation of wireless, referred to as 5G, but that they had to prove their case.

Bill Baer, a former head of the antitrust division, had told the New York Times in 2014: “It’s going to be hard for someone to make a persuasive case that reducing four firms to three is actually going to improve competition for the benefit of American consumers.”

Reporting by Diane Bartz; Editing by Dan Grebler

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PlayStation Gold Wireless Headset Review (2018): Finally Golden
April 6, 2018 6:08 pm|Comments (0)

Have you ever tried using Sony’s pitiful little mono headset that comes with every PlayStation 4? It’s a chintzy freebie at best, and a no-good, annoying, keeps-coming-unclipped-from-your-collar, hanging hellion the rest of the time.

Sony’s 2014 Gold Wireless Headset also angered gamers due to a fragile, crack-prone headband. With this track record, you’d be forgiven for ignoring Sony’s new 2018 Gold Wireless Headset. I was pretty skeptical myself, but aside from a few issues, it’s been one of the best wireless headsets I’ve used on the PS4. I even recommended in our list of best PS4 accessories.

Black is the New Gold

Like the first PlayStation Gold Headset, the color is a bit of a misnomer. You won’t find any gold on them. Like a Model T, this headset is completely black, from earcup to headband, with part of it wrapped in a soft leather-like material. The headband and ear cushions have some extra padding on them, because of unique design of the headband and how it connects with the earcups.

Most headsets are full of hinges and hangers so they can turn and adjust every which way, but not the Gold. Underneath all that faux leather, its entire headband is a single curved horseshoe piece of metal (or possibly an extremely durable plastic) that you pull apart to fit your head.

The earcups don’t flex forward and back a whole lot (just a wiggle), but they can slide up and down the band itself, which makes for a surprisingly comfortable fit. Sony says these are designed to fit around the PlayStation VR headset. Those with wider heads, glasses, or larger ears may want to look elsewhere, though. This design gets less comfortable the bigger your head is, and the padding is thin enough that it will lightly pinch a pair of frames.

It’s not great for those of us with moderate-sized domes, either. I had to slide the earcups up some, which covered up the L and R labels, making it hard to figure out how to put these on. And because there is no boom mic, I had to spend a few extra seconds figuring out which end is the front and back. Sony is far from the first headset maker with this problem. A little rotation in the earcups would also make resting the headset on your shoulders and neck far more comfortable in-between matches.

Lost in the Gloss

The only area on the PlayStation Gold that isn’t brushed or leathery are the glossy vinyl-like edges of the earcups, where all the buttons and controls are located. It’s never a smart idea to gloss up the one area that’s constantly under attack by finger grease, but alas that’s exactly what Sony did here.

The controls themselves are okay, but could be easier to feel and find. Everything is on the left earcup, which seems to be the norm for most headsets. The mute button is on the lower back side, above it is a volume rocker and above that is a toggle for 7.1 virtual surround sound, which simulates surround. I don’t love this feature for most games because it sounds unnatural, but it’s present and accounted for.

On the front is another toggle, but this one adjusts your chat mix (how loud your friends sound compared to the game). Below it is a switch that turns off the headset or puts it in the standard or extra bassy setting. The extra bass adds to the immersion if you’re playing anything with explosions or bullet fire, and if you download the Sony Headset Companion app on your PS4, you can replace that bass boost with game-specific effects, or fully tweak the bass, treble, and mids to your delight.

It took some time to discover, but holding down the mute button also turns on two levels of mic monitoring, which Sony calls sidetones. This lets you hear your own voice as you talk. It helps me talk at a more reasonable volume instead of shouting just to make sure others are hearing what I’m saying. Try it out!

Missing Mic, Cool Connection

The lack of a physical mic is a bummer. None of my friends complained about the quality of my audio, but it wasn’t nearly as good as many headsets. Sony does attempt to isolate the sound of your voice, but it would do a much better job if it had a microphone that could be positioned near your mouth like most of its competitors.

Normally, I’d complain that it’s hard to know if you’re muted or not, but thanks to the high level of integration this headset has with the PS4 (it’s made by Sony, after all), a prompt pops onscreen in the upper left to tell you the battery life, mute status, and whether virtual surround is on any time you adjust a setting. I wish more headsets had this feature.

The battery indicator in that onscreen popup is especially helpful. The Gold gets a decent 7-ish hours of wireless play time thanks to its 570mAh battery, but that’s nowhere near the 15 hours Turtle Beach’s Stealth 600 (8/10 WIRED Recommends) can reach. Unlike that headset, this one comes with an optional 3.5mm audio cable, so even if you run out of battery, you can still plug it in to your controller and keep playing. With the cord plugged in you can use the headset with any compatible system or player. It charges with an included micro USB cable.

Wireless play has been stable and I’ve had no connection problems. It uses a USB dongle to transmit a 2.4GHz wireless signal, which I found to be very stable. The only cutouts I’ve had are when I leave and walk to another room.

Going for the Gold

This is one of the clearest wireless headsets I’ve used, and the bass is quite boomy. I found myself watching Netflix and listening to music with them on from time to time, even with a pile of other headsets to choose from. I still play Fortnite a lot, and the sounds of my footsteps pattering through the woods, avoiding conflict at all costs because I’m a terrible shot, are quite crisp.

The PlayStation Gold Headset can’t quite match up to expensive heavyweights like the hi-fi Arctis Pro line or comfortable Sony PlayStation Platinum, but it doesn’t have to. At around $ 100 it’s one of the best wireless headsets for PS4, and if you hook up that optional wire, it can connect to a whole lot more. It took Sony four years to get this headset just right, but we’re glad it decided to try again.

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SoftBank considers IPO for Japan wireless unit, said to seek $18 billion
January 15, 2018 6:00 am|Comments (0)

TOKYO (Reuters) – SoftBank Group Corp (9984.T) said on Monday it was considering listing its Japanese wireless business, seeking to raise a reported $ 18 billion in a move that would accelerate the conglomerate’s transformation into one of the world’s biggest tech investors.

A spin-off – potentially the biggest IPO by a Japanese company in nearly two decades – would also give the unit more autonomy as well as help investors with valuing the business and its parent.

SoftBank Group, which saw its shares climb 4 percent on the news, has a vast range of holdings including stakes in British chip designer ARM Holdings ARM.L, struggling U.S. wireless service provider Sprint Corp (S.N) as well as Alibaba Group Holding Ltd (BABA.N).

It has with other investors also set up a $ 93 billion Vision Fund, that is investing in range of firms to capitalize on a tech future expected to be driven by artificial intelligence, robotics and interconnected devices.

SoftBank Group plans to sell some 30 percent of SoftBank Corp, raising around 2 trillion yen ($ 18 billion) that would go towards investments in growth, such as buying into foreign information-technology companies, the Nikkei newspaper said without citing sources.

It plans to seek approval from the Tokyo Stock Exchange as early as spring and aims to debut in Tokyo as well as overseas, possibly London, around autumn, the business daily said.

SoftBank Group said in a statement that a listing of the business was one option for its capital strategy but that no such decision had been made.

A 2 trillion yen ($ 18 billion) IPO would be one of the biggest listings by a Japanese company, rivaling the 2.2 trillion yen 1986 offering of Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp (9432.T) as well as a 2.1 trillion yen listing by NTT DoCoMo Inc (9437.T) a decade later.

“It makes sense to spin off the mobile-phone business using a public offering that would leave SoftBank in control and provide SoftBank with more cash to pursue its strategy of investing in companies with potentially high growth prospects,” Erik Gordon, a professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business.

“It is a way of obtaining capital without adding debt or diluting SoftBank’s equity interests in the growth companies.”

The domestic telecoms unit, Japan’s No. 3 wireless carrier, posted a 4.5 percent rise in operating profit to 720 billion yen in the year ended March on sales of 3.2 trillion yen.

SoftBank Group’s complicated structure and constant stream of new investments have left many investors struggling to value the company with analysts often noting that its market value does not accurately reflect the value of its massive holdings.

SoftBank’s market value currently stands at around $ 92 billion. By contrast, its near 30 percent stake in Alibaba is worth around $ 140 billion.

Large companies seeking to list in Tokyo are required to float at least 35 percent of their shares although these rules can be eased when the company is also listing overseas.

Reporting by Yoshiyasu Shida and Sam Nussey; Additional reporting by Chris Gallagher and Minami Funakoshi; Writing by William Mallard; Editing by Edwina Gibbs

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AT&T Wireless Workers Try To Bring Political Pressure To End Contract Stalemate
October 7, 2017 12:00 am|Comments (0)

Negotiations have dragged on since February.

As a contract standoff between AT&T and 21,000 unionized workers in its mobile business drags into a eighth month, the employees are trying to increase political pressure on the carrier.

So far, 255 state and local politicians have sent letters to AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson backing the workers, the Communications Workers of America union says. Among the senders are six Democratic senators and numerous members of California’s delegation in the House of Representatives.

“While we are aware of the changes that have taken place in the telecommunications industry, we know that AT&T wireless workers are the driving force behind your most profitable division,” 12 members of the Arizona House of Representatives wrote to Stephenson in one recent letter. “They deserve to share in the company’s success and growth.”

Still, AT&T does not appear moved by the campaign or earlier moves by the mobile workers in 36 states and Washington, D.C., including a protest outside Apple headquarters for the debut of new iPhones last month and a short strike in May that forced many wireless stores to close for a weekend.

Although the workers have concerns about wages, health benefits, and other issues, job security and sales commission rates appear to be at the center of the dispute. To highlight the issue of call center jobs being outsourced to foreign countries, some AT&T workers traveled to the Dominican Republic in early May to meet with their counterparts there who now handle AT&T customer service calls.

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AT&T said on Friday that it has been in touch with the letter writers and plans to continue to bargain with the workers, whose contract expired in February, to reach a “fair” agreement . “We regularly communicate with our stakeholders regarding labor issues and bargaining, and we’ve done so where we’ve received any letters from legislators,” an AT&T spokesman said.

The CWA says AT&T won’t negotiate over job security at call centers and retail stores where many of the employees work. “AT&T has increased its profits by cutting workers’ commissions, refused to bargain over job security even as it cut hundreds of call center jobs this year alone, and increasingly moved to low-wage contractors for its retail and call center operations,” Dennis Trainor, vice president for CWA district 1, said in a statement. “That’s not how America’s largest telecom should be acting.”

AT&T t has a long history of labor peace, though the May strike interrupted a run of more than four years without a walkout. The company says it has reached 32 agreements covering some 145,000 workers since the beginning of 2015. The strike in May, which also included 17,000 workers in AT&T’s telecom business, followed last year’s bitter, seven week strike at Verizon vz .

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The Real Problem With UBeam’s Wireless Charging Tech: You Don’t Need It
May 12, 2016 11:30 pm|Comments (0)

The tech world is all abuzz again about another startup failing to live up to its promises.


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InventionShare Announces the Launch of 5by5 Wireless, Major…
September 3, 2015 10:40 pm|Comments (0)

The 5by5 Wireless system, a world-wide breakthrough, now allows a wireless service provider to offer telephone, internet and broadcast services in any area but can focus on rural and remote areas…

(PRWeb September 03, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/09/prweb12941921.htm


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