Tag Archives: World

It's Time For Social Media to Change the World (Again)
February 17, 2019 6:00 pm|Comments (0)

In the summer of 2007, soon after a college intern convinced me to join Facebook, I remember thinking, “This is going to change everything. This is going to change the world.”

Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Snapchat, and other social networks, blogs, and interactive online media have undoubtedly impacted billions of people over the past 12 years. Social media has helped topple dictatorships and given a voice to many millions of people previously unheard. It has reunited families, reconnected old friends, and rekindled romances. It has created opportunities for a massive number of small business owners, authors, and entrepreneurs. My wife and I are two of those people.  

But there has also been a dark side to the last 12 years of social media: Cyber-bullying, negative headlines, data and security breaches, Russian interference in elections, impact on mental health,–the list of harmful elements of social media, sadly, goes on and on.

Whether you log on and see someone complaining about something small, like how boring a tv show was last night, or something big, like how toxic our current political environment is, it’s impossible to use social media these days without constant exposure to negativity.

Forty-one percent of Generation Z social media users recently said that social media makes them feel sad, anxious, or depressed. A 2017 study found that the more time 18-22-year-olds spent on social media per day, “the greater the association with anxiety symptoms.” Disinformation Twitter accounts continue to publish more than a million tweets per day. The majority of teens have come across racist or sexist hate speech on social media. Nearly 43% of teens have been bullied online, and 41% of all Americans have experienced online harassment. The data is all startling, but we don’t need the data to know how we feel when we log in and check our feeds.

What then can we do to combat the negativity? Could we all quit social media? No, in 2019, social media is an unavoidable part of our lives, for better or for worse. We could put the responsibility in the hands of the social media companies themselves, but they haven’t exactly proven trustworthy lately. So really, the only thing we can do is to change our individual behavior. And it starts with small acts of kindness that will have a ripple effect.

Here’s one idea: #BeLikeableDay, a global movement which asks people and organizations to pledge to take one minute out of the day on February 26th to commit to an act of kindness on social media. Compliment a friend on their outfit on Instagram, share gratitude for a neighbor on Facebook, or leave an unsolicited recommendation for a colleague on LinkedIn. Re-tweet a charitable cause on Twitter, or simply say something nice on the social network of your choice.

Together, one person and one act of kindness at a time, we can start to make social media a more positive place to spend our time, first, on February 26th, and then, maybe eventually, every day. And here’s the good news: Online acts of kindness don’t just change the world of social media for the better, they change you for the better.

recent study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggest that performing small, kind gestures diffuses stress and improves mental health. In a Berkeley study, participants reported greater feelings of calmness and increased self-esteem after helping others. Committing acts of kindness even lowers your blood pressure: According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, author of The 5 Side Effects of Kindness, acts of kindness release the hormone oxytocin. Oxytocin causes the release of nitric oxide, which in turn reduces your blood pressure. Yes, there is science to being nice online! 

So, instead of complaining about all of the negativity and toxicity of social media, and making it even more negative, how about choosing positivity on social media, on #BeLikeableDay and every day? You might improve your mood. You might even change the world.

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eFootball's coming home; FIFA's virtual World Cup kicks off
August 3, 2018 12:00 am|Comments (0)

LONDON (Reuters) – The 2018 World Cup is over and now for the FIFA eWorld Cup, a virtual tournament that kicked off in London on Thursday with goals galore and multiple Cristiano Ronaldos and Lionel Messis strutting their stuff on a digital stage.

The FIFA eWorld Grand Final trophy on display during the tournament at the O2 Arena in London, Britain August 2, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

The three-day finals see 32 elite players, distilled from a global pool of 20 million starters worldwide, flexing thumbs and fingers for the prize of a shiny trophy and $ 250,000 to the winner.

England’s 21-year-old Spencer Ealing, the reigning champion who plays under the nickname ‘Gorilla’, is back ‘to defend what’s mine’.

Germany boasts eight finalists and Argentina just one but 18-year-old Nicolas ‘nicolas99fc’ Villalba — a man who eschews compatriot Messi for Ronaldo and Brazilians Neymar, Ronaldinho and Ronaldo Nazario in his team lineup — is a favorite.

Some have big name clubs behind them, such as Manchester City’s Kai ‘Deto’ Wollin or fellow-German and Bayer Leverkusen player Marvin ‘M4RV’ Hintz, but others are unaffiliated.

The group stages, with 16 playing the FIFA 18 game on Xbox One and the other 16 on PlayStation4, started with the audience online only until the doors are opened on Saturday at the O2 Arena in London’s docklands.

The group stages of the FIFA eWorld Grand Final get underway at the O2 Arena in London, Britain August 2, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

The semi-finals and final will be on Saturday after group stages and knockout rounds, with most of the teams featuring the same top players in virtual form.

RANDOM TESTS

The tournament echoes the real World Cup played in Russia this year in other ways as well, including anti-doping urine tests and the monitoring of betting markets for suspicious activity.

Malta’s Kurt’kurt0411’ Fenech, a 23-year-old former odds compiler for a sports betting company who says he now earns far more from gaming, welcomed that.

“People might think ‘Oh, it doesn’t belong in esport’ but it 100 percent does,” he told reporters in a roped-off World Cup-style media mixed zone.

“We have to play a game which requires full concentration and I know that there’s stuff out there that can help you with that. So I’m really pleased there is an anti-doping. It’s needed in every sport and we are a sport now.

“The testing is really extreme, it’s like professional football.

Professional Xbox and Playstation players take their positions for the group stages of the FIFA eWorld Grand Final at the O2 Arena in London, Britain August 2, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

“They’ve just picked three people randomly,” he added, gesturing towards the brightly lit ‘field of play’ where players and coaches sat in booths and stared intensely at screens.

Alexander ‘Alekzandur’ Garcia Betancourt, the only American in the finals, said Adderall was the drug most commonly mentioned.

“It’s normally for people with ADHD so if you don’t have that and you abuse it, it’s very easy to gain an advantage,” he said.

“It’s good that they are doing that now with the doping controls,” added the 19-year-old Kansas City native who has signed for his local MLS side.

“We follow the same WADA (World Anti-Doping Agency) regulations as normal athletes. We have to follow those rules, make sure we’re not taking anything we’re not supposed to.”

Fenech, who estimated his earnings were on a par with those of professional Maltese soccer players, felt he was also representing his country — whose team are ranked 184th in the world by FIFA , one place behind Bhutan and just ahead of Macau.

“If I can go on to win this I could become president,” he laughed.

“Our football is nowhere near where we should be and we do usually finish last so for me to compete with the best of the other countries – Germany, France, England – it’s definitely something for a country to be proud of.”

Editing by Peter Rutherford

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How A Group of Imprisoned Hackers Introduced JPay to the World
July 28, 2018 12:00 am|Comments (0)

Until yesterday, unless you had a family member or friend in prison, you most likely had never heard of JPay. That’s because all of its services are directed toward inmates and their families.

Since 2002, JPay has been quietly moving into prisons across the country, first by providing quicker (though pricier) ways for family members to send money to loved ones behind bars and, since 2004, by providing limited email systems in prisons. Those systems are often touted as an innovation that keeps incarcerated people connected with support networks on the outside. In keeping up with the technological times, JPay also offers prison-specific tablets on which users can access their e-messages, buy music, and play electronic games.

But this week, Idaho prison officials announced that these tablets became the means for 363 inmates, across five state prisons, to create nearly a quarter million dollars of credits. Collectively, the prisoners created roughly $ 225,000 in JPay credits, which they added to their respective accounts to pay for e-messages, music, and games. In a statement to the Associated Press, Idaho Department of Correction spokesman Jeff Ray said that, of the 363 imprisoned hackers, 50 men credited their accounts in amounts exceeding $ 1,000 with the largest amount falling just under $ 10,000.

Idaho is just one of a number of states across the country offering tablets to incarcerated populations. Nearly half of all state prison systems offer some form of e-messaging, a basic form of prison email provided by a single company that controls both software and hardware. In Idaho, that company is JPay. One of the largest purveyors of prison messaging, JPay contracts as the sole provider of these services in 20 states across the country.

And Idaho is also one of a growing number of states where prisoners have the option to purchase a JPay tablet. Unlike the Kindle Fire or the IPad, these tablets are specific to JPay and an imprisoned population—one cannot access the Internet or other services through the tablet. But it allows users to to listen to music, read e-books, play video games, and avoid the lengthy lines at the JPay kiosks to read and write e-messages. All of these services come at a cost. In Idaho, sending a single e-message costs 47 cents, while downloading music costs as much as $ 3.50. As 363 people in Idaho found out, they can also use those tablets to get around these costs.

“The Idaho Department of Correction has nothing more to say about this matter at this time,” Ray wrote in response to WIRED. In a statement emailed to WIRED, JPay spokesperson Jade Trombetta wrote, “While the vast majority of individuals use our secure technology appropriately, we are continually working to improve our products to prevent any attempts at misuse.”

As the sole provider of e-messaging and digital services within Idaho’s prison system, it might stand to reason that the company’s monopoly increased its risk of hacking. “If you’re forced to buy from one entity, I could see the increasing motivation,” says Jake Williams, a security expert and founder of Rendition Infosec. “But I don’t think this [monopoly] increases vulnerabilty to hacking.”

Instead, says Williams, any system offering an app over a device operates at a risk.“Any time you have a mobile app—whether it’s a phone or a tablet—the user has a lot of control over any data stored in the device itself,” he explained. In contrast to a web application, where data is stored on a web server, the data on a mobile app is more likely to be stored locally, meaning it remains on the phone or tablet. “A malicious user can access that back-end data,” says Williams.

It’s a problem that Williams sees often. He points to a recent vulnerability assessment that Renditions conducted on a mobile shopping app. To limit the amount of data being transmitted over the network, the app stored the item price on the SQLite database, a back-end storage mechanism on the app itself. But by modifying the price on that back-end system, “we could change the purchase price and buy the item for whatever price we wanted,” Williams recalls. “This is not an uncommon flaw with mobile apps.”

For JPay or any other provider offering tablets, a person’s credit balance is most likely stored on the tablet rather than being transmitted on JPay’s infrastructure to a centralized server. This makes it accessible for someone savvy enough to hack into the SQLite database and change their account.

Though they can still send and receive e-messages, the 363 hackers have temporarily lost their ability to download music and games until they compensate JPay for its losses, Ray told the Associated Press. They’ve also been issued disciplinary tickets, which means losing even more privileges and being labeled at a higher security risk level, a classification that could mean being moved to a more restrictive prison, being excluded from certain prison programs, and even being denied parole.

What would make a person, let alone 363 people, take that chance? In Idaho, prison wages range from 10 to 90 cents an hour. That, says Peter Wagner, director of the Prison Policy Initiative, can be a powerful motivator to figure out ways to increase one’s spending power. “JPay is a company that charges 47 cents to send an email. That’s five hours of wages,” he noted.


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This Bomb-Simulating US Supercomputer Broke a World Record
July 23, 2018 12:00 pm|Comments (0)

Brad Settlemyer had a supercomputing solution in search of a problem. Los Alamos National Lab, where Settlemyer works as a research scientist, hosts the Trinity supercomputer—a machine that regularly makes the internet’s (ever-evolving) Top 10 Fastest lists. As large as a Midwestern McMansion, Trinity’s main job is to ensure that the cache of US nuclear weapons works when it’s supposed to, and doesn’t when it’s not.

The supercomputer doesn’t dedicate all its digital resources to stockpile stewardship, though. During its nuclear downtime, it also does fundamental research.

Settlemyer wanted to expand the machine’s scientific envelope. So he set out in search of a problem that even Trinity couldn’t currently solve. What he found was a physicist who wanted to follow only the most energetic particles through a trillion-particle simulation—a problem whose technological solutions have surprising implications for the bomb babysitters at Los Alamos.

Settlemyer and his team—a collaboration with Carnegie Mellon’s Parallel Data Lab—had been working for a while on a way to create huge numbers of files very fast. But they didn’t know how far could they push that capability. How many files, and how fast? “We were working on this tech, and we needed a use case,” he says. “What we really wanted to was find something over the top.”

So they started asking around Los Alamos, and found a lab scientist studying “Fermi acceleration,” a speed-up that happens to the particles in supernovae and solar flares. As particles oscillate back and forth, they gain speed along the way—acting kind of like pinballs bouncing between bumpers. The scientist wanted to simulate a plasma, the fourth state of matter that’s just a stew of dismembered nuclei and electrons, and see if its pinballs accelerated this way.

To do so, however, he needed to find out which few thousand particles—out of a trillion or so—accelerated to the highest speeds. “The problem,” according to Settlemyer, “is you don’t know until the end.” That made the particles essentially untrackable under the existing computing limits.

But maybe he and his team could fix that, if they could gin up files fast enough. They’d use a kind of program called a “vector particle-in-cell,” or VPIC code, invented at Los Alamos back [in 1955(http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.470.2911&rep=rep1&type=pdf). This program essentially allows scientists to keep track of individual particles, to see where they go and what they do in a certain situation. In nuclear research, scientists often use particle-in-cell code to understand how plasma mixes with plasma.

That mixing matters for Los Alamos because nuclear bombs produce plasma. Scientists don’t explode bombs with abandon anymore to understand them—as they did in the early days, turning islands into holes. Instead, they simulate bombs’ statuses, and look back at old videos to try to simulate what they see. To date, they haven’t been able to get at all the nuance in the footage. But with slick new simulations, Settlemyer says maybe they can.

But first, they had to test their file-creation speed limits using the physicist’s Fermi acceleration problem.

Here’s how such a simulation would classically work: The supercomputer would essentially take snapshots of all trillion particles at once, throughout the process. To find the most energetic characters in the final picture, and then rewind through their trajectories, the supercomputer would need to dig through each snapshot (each a couple of terabytes) to pull out the path of the relevant particles. “That was a huge cost,” says Settlemyer. Too huge: It would have crashed Trinity.

Settlemyer’s solution was, instead, to create more files with less information: one file for every particle, tracing each one through the entirety of the simulation. If Settlemyer put those files into a searchable index, the scientist could simply ask the computer, “Which of those particles’ lives ends with the biggest bang?”

The scientist can then just pull and parse those personal dossiers. “We’re able to retrieve the data between 1,000 and 5,000 times faster,” adds Settlemyer. Fast enough to make the scientist’s Fermi acceleration research doable. Trinity created a trillion files in two minutes—a world record.

It’s not just an academic achievement. That speed could allow scientists to follow the trajectory of a particle (or 10,000 particles) in a trillion-particle warhead simulation. The warheads whose integrity, remember, Los Alamos is tasked with maintaining.

The US hasn’t added new warheads to its stockpile in decades. But based on the nation’s first Nuclear Posture Review since 2010, that may be changing—and bringing more work to places like Los Alamos. “Many hoped conditions had been set for deep reductions in global nuclear arsenals, and perhaps for their elimination,” read a draft of the review. “These aspirations have not been realized. … We must look reality in the eye and see the world as it is, not as we wish it to be.”


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Tesla: A Changing World
March 29, 2018 6:10 pm|Comments (0)

Tesla (TSLA) continues to struggle with Model 3 production. The company went through similar machinations with the Roadster, Model S and Model X, though this time things were supposed to be different. Why does the company continue to command a premium valuation considering their ongoing difficulties? Investors in the company – both long and short – would be wise to understand this valuation dynamic and how it is likely to change going forward as more electric cars, from more manufacturers enter the market.

Exceptionally Valued

Tesla is an exceptional company. The market assigns a value to Tesla similar to that of General Motors (GM) though Tesla only makes a tiny fraction of the cars GM does. Tesla isn’t making money (overall) at the moment, and while their reported manufacturing margins have been high compared to those of many legacy carmakers, those margins alone are insufficient to justify the high premium enjoyed by Tesla shares.

A purely economic analysis of the company based on reported results cannot justify the current share price. Many analysts have performed this kind of evaluation of Tesla again and again going back all the way to Tesla’s IPO. Currently on Seeking Alpha, analyst EnerTuition is looking to see a $ 1 billion loss for Tesla in Q1, David Trainer suggests TSLA holders bail because the company will never earn enough to justify its price, and reliably pessimistic (and short) Montana Skeptic points us to another analyst’s record loss prediction.

The simple fact is that Tesla shares have never been worth the price based on the company’s financials. The market has always, and continues to factor future expectations into the price of Tesla shares. For investors, this means that understanding Tesla’s financials alone is not enough. Sound investment decisions about Tesla also require an assessment of how the market will view the company and its vision for an electric vehicle future going forward. This kind of market sentiment assessment is by its nature qualitative, not quantitative.

This article explores something even fuzzier – the overall circumstances against which Tesla’s vision will be seen and assessed. I believe it is important to look at this topic now because the world of players and rules surrounding the company is changing and this will likely change the way the market looks at Tesla. Investors who continue to view Tesla as playing in a world without significant competition are likely to reach different assessments of coming market sentiment and perhaps suffer as a result.

Tesla – What Success Looks Like

To be successful enough to justify the current market valuation, Tesla must grow to many time its current size, perhaps 50-100 times current unit volume. This implies that the vision of a successful Tesla is of a carmaker producing 5 million to 10 million cars and trucks annually within a decade or so. A successful vision of Tesla growth might look something like this.

A vision of successful Tesla growth Presented in isolation, this kind of growth for Tesla appears impressive indeed. And, it really doesn’t matter too much whether peak of the curve is 5 million or 20 million units. This is a story of exponential growth and many investors will want to be along for the ride. There are and will always be naysayers who believe the company will implode, collapse or retire to bankruptcy court, but those folks don’t buy the stock. What matters is that the kind of growth scenarios that inspire investors to purchase Tesla shares look something like this, and presented in isolation, such growth projections look spectacular.

The change that is coming for investor expectation is significant BEV offerings emerging from large legacy carmakers. Volkswagen (OTCPK:VLKAY) for instance has made major commitments to new battery-powered models and recently concluded $ 25 billion in battery supply contracts. General Motors has publicly committed to 100% electric cars, with 20 new models by 2023. Audi, BMW (OTCPK:BMWYY), Hyundai (OTCPK:HYMTF), Jaguar (NYSE:TTM), Kia (OTCPK:KIMTF) and Nissan (OTCPK:NSANY) are introducing new or updated electric cars to the US this year.

Improved battery manufacturing processes are lowering battery cost and in some cases circumventing supply barriers such as that of limited cobalt supplies. This means that quite soon, Tesla will not be operating, or viewed by investors, in the same degree of isolation as in the past. The following graph illustrates why this matters.

Tesla growth in context of overall car market In this chart, the same Tesla growth is shown as in the first chart. Notice how this growth that looked so spectacular when viewed in isolation looks more subdued in the context of a market with other players. These two charts show exactly the same, arguably spectacular, Tesla growth scenario, but the “gut level” impact is very different when the context changes from Tesla operating in isolation to participating in a larger market with other players. And, this difference in perception is, in the case of Tesla, quite important. Because as pointed out earlier, the price of the company’s shares reflects market perception more than it does Tesla’s hard operating results.

Neither of these charts represent deep analysis, nor should they be taken as prediction of specific outcomes either for Tesla or for the car market generally. They are intended only to illustrate how differently Tesla’s “story” is likely to be perceived as the context surrounding the company changes and more electric cars from more carmakers enter the marketplace.

We should perhaps remind ourselves that Tesla can become very, very successful without making all, or even most of, the world’s cars. Tesla does not need to drive GM or Volkswagen or Toyota (NYSE:TM) or any other carmaker out of business to handsomely reward shareholders. For all the company’s trials and tribulations, Tesla continues to move ahead. There is plenty of room in the car market to allow Tesla to succeed in the end.

Tesla investors in the near to medium term will look more to perceptions about how the company fits into the overall car market than to company performance and vision seen in isolation. This is a different investor viewpoint from the one that has driven Tesla’s share price in the past.

It may be better for the stock price, or it may be the opposite. That will depend most likely on what specific news about the company emerges over time. Investors should be attuned to the idea that the market will begin to view Tesla news from a different point of view than in the past. Because, investors who see things most clearly are often the ones who come out on top.

Disclosure: I/we have no positions in any stocks mentioned, but may initiate a long position in TSLA over the next 72 hours.

I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from Seeking Alpha). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

Additional disclosure: These writings about the technical aspects of Tesla, electric cars,components, supply chain and the like are intended to stimulate awareness and discussion of these issues. Investors should view my work in this light and seek other competent technical advice on the subject issues before making investment decisions.

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Riot Games Esports Co-Head Talks ‘League of Legends’ 2017 World Championship
October 21, 2017 12:00 am|Comments (0)

The world’s top competitive video gamers are facing off in China over the next few weeks for the League of Legends 2017 World Championship, one of the premier tournaments in the fast-growing world of esports.

Hosted by Riot Games, the company that makes the popular League of Legends (LoL) online game, the tournament’s early rounds turned in a fair amount of excitement and upsets, though last year’s champion is still standing. The Korean professional esports team SK Telecom T1 remains a favorite in a field that also features teams like Samsung Galaxy (sponsored by the South Korean electronics giant) and the North American team Cloud 9.

If none of those names ring a bell, then the rapid ascension of esports has likely passed you by. Competitive gaming’s popularity around the world has exploded in recent years, and the esports industry is now expected to generate more than $ 1.5 billion in annual revenue by 2020, according to one estimate.

Meanwhile, major professional sports teams like the New York Yankees and Cleveland Cavaliers are throwing money at esports, while tech giants like Amazon and Google compete to lure gaming fans to stream live gameplay and competitions on their digital video platforms, Twitch and YouTube, respectively. Last year, Riot Games (which is owned by Chinese tech giant Tencent) signed a reported $ 300 million streaming rights deal with Walt Disney’s BAMTech, and this year’s LoL world championship tournament is available for streaming around the world on Twitch and YouTube.

The influx of media rights deals has also opened the door for a range of high-profile corporate sponsors, with Riot Games landing sponsorships in recent years from the likes of Acer Gaming, Coca-Cola, T-Mobile, and Mercedes-Benz.

This week Fortune caught up with Jarred Kennedy, the co-head of esports at Riot Games, to discuss the world championship (the finals will take place Nov. 4 at the Bird’s Nest National Stadium in Beijing) as well as the overall growth of the esports industry and Riot’s plans, much like rival Activision Blizzard, to remodel its own esports league after major professional sports leagues like the NFL and NBA.

The following conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Fortune: What are some of the big storylines fans will be following heading into the quarterfinals of the LoL World Championships this weekend?

Kennedy: Where to begin? We’ve got some great teams that have made it through. Lots of regions are still alive. You’ve got your defending champions, SK Telecom T1, where they always are, which is contending. But, you’ve got teams that are potentially going to give them a run for their money. I think if [Chinese team] Royal Never Give Up and SK Telecom T1 wind up meeting in the semifinals in Shanghai that could be incredible. Honestly, any of the match-ups with the teams we have right now are going to be really fun to watch, because they’ve all proven themselves to get to this stage. And, the competition just keeps getting better and better the deeper we get into the tournament. That’s one of the reasons that worlds is so compelling.

How has the media rights aspect of the esports business expanded in recent years for Riot?

I think what you’re seeing is the maturation of our sport. With esports, I wouldn’t say it’s entered the mainstream, but it is increasingly an option that marketers look to. And, that’s great for us, because what we’re trying to do is build up the overall ecosystem, and having those increases in revenue coming in on that side allows us to invest in the professional players, the teams, and it allows these players to make a career out of this in a really meaningful way.

That leads into the bigger question of the esports industry’s overall growth trajectory. What are the areas of business that you think are most ripe for increasing revenue in the industry?

There are lots of different pools of revenue. Big ones would include media rights, which not unlike the NFL, NBA, or the Premier League, media rights are a large driver. For some games, including ours, there’s in-game content, and that’s something that’s unique to esports, as opposed to stick-and-ball or traditional sports, where there’s an opportunity for teams to participate in some of the in-game revenue streams. I think those are probably the biggest ones, but we’re always on the lookout for new ways to engage with fans of our sport.

You used to work at Sony Pictures Television. Would it benefit esports to make that leap to being more of a presence on traditional TV networks?

We don’t feel the need to go to TV as a point of validation. We’ve found that a lot of our fans of this sport are online, they tend to consume digitally, and thus the BAMTech deal and some other things we’ve done—negotiations with Twitch, YouTube, etc.—is just to serve them where they are. But, we’re not looking to be on NBC at 8 p.m. on a Saturday broadcasting to all of America, because we don’t think that’s where our fans want to watch, and we think it would probably be casting too wide of a net.

Why model Riot Games’ North American League of Legends Championship Series league after major professional sports leagues with revenue-sharing and a players association?

We’ve always looked at professional sports, not because we want to model exactly what other sports do, but even when you’re attempting to innovate, sometimes there are things that already exist in the world that work really well and work for a reason, and we shouldn’t be afraid to use some of that. Our goal is to have sophisticated owners of teams that can operate at a high level, know how to build businesses, know how to build sports, and who aren’t going to be working against each other, but are going to be collaborating in the best interests of fans around the world.

Going back to your point about esports not yet being in the mainstream, what needs to happen to put esports on the same level as one of the major professional sports leagues?

It takes time to get to the scale of where major sports are today, and I don’t think we have any illusions that we’re going to be able to do that overnight. We do have the advantage of being a digital property that tends to grow faster and can grow more virally. Friends tend to bring their friends into the sport, we found. We’re looking to build the best ecosystem for our fans that we can and we hope that by doing that it will thrive and grow, and over time we’ll have a chance to be as big as some of the major sports that exist today. But our primary goal is delivering value to fans day in and day out. And, if we can do that, then the rest will take care of itself.

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FX’s Taboo Is Basically Bizarro World Jane Austen
August 3, 2017 7:00 pm|Comments (0)

FX’s Taboo Is Basically Bizarro World Jane Austen

The FX show shares a setting with Jane Austen’s stories—but nothing else. The post FX’s Taboo Is Basically Bizarro World Jane Austen appeared first on WIRED.
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Gerber’s Bill Brewster to Speak About Mega-Trends at IACDE World Convention 2017
May 7, 2017 12:00 am|Comments (0)

Cloud computing aids efficient supply chain processes and collaboration for customers and partners around the globe. 3D imaging accelerating …
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Watch Gorillaz Break Into The Real World With Their First Live Interview
April 22, 2017 3:50 pm|Comments (0)

Murdoc and 2D from Gorillaz gave their first live on-camera interview with BBC Radio 1 to discuss the band’s new album, Humanz.

Source: http://www.mtv.com/news/3005039/gorillaz-first-live-interview-bbc/

Asia Argento Aubrey ODay Audrina Patridge Autumn Reeser Avril Lavigne Bali Rodriguez


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9 things from Mobile World Congress you should be excited about
April 14, 2017 9:20 am|Comments (0)

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Yes, there was no Samsung Galaxy S8 and yes, its absence was felt. But even without it, Mobile World Congress — the largest mobile show of the year — was anything but boring. 

This year, everyone’s crazy for retro phones. LG slapped competitors in the face with a surprisingly solid flagship. A futuristic-looking, hyperconnected car debuted at MWC instead of at the Geneva Motor Show. And there were just enough weird gadgets for us to geek out over while we sped through the Fira Gran Via’s sprawling convention center halls.

More about Mobile, Smartphones, Top Picks, Mwc17, and Mwc


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